Thursday, April 17, 2014. Last Update: Wed 3:22 PM EST

Monthly Archive

March 2010

Bloomberg on the CDO Shuffle That Helped Break AIG

Bloomberg dropped a major investigation today on the AIG collapse, shedding much-needed light on the conflicted role of CDO managers... More

Big Hole in an NYT Story on Oil Prices

The New York Times writes that oil prices have been remarkably stable over the last year, settling into what it... More

Stream of Consciousness

SnapStream and the future of searchable video

About a month ago, while on a business trip to New York from his tech company’s headquarters in Houston, Texas,... More

LAT: Journalists Targeted in Honduras

The Los Angeles Times reports on some distressing news from Central America: Nine months after a military-led coup plunged Honduras... More

A Tribune Lecture on Indebtedness

The Chicago Tribune scolds the government for taking on too much debt. And the paper knows whereof it speaks. Boy... More

Knoller Knows, Part II

This morning Mark Knoller, CBS Radio's longstanding White House correspondent, has a well deserved profile in the Wall Street Journal... More

Nature News Now Free of Charge

Publisher sees no competition with Scientific American

Last Friday, the Nature Publishing Group (NPG) announced that readers would no longer need a subscription to view content on... More

Demolishing the Banks’ Anti-Consumer Spin

The banking industry has helped water down consumer financial protection by arguing that consumer protection is a job best done... More

Picture This

As the professional path for photojournalists fades, what’s being lost?

Yesterday, a story on the Web site of The New York Times noted the seismic shifts roiling the field of... More

More on Weathermen as Climate Skeptics

NYT weighs in with front-page treatment

The New York Times’s front-page story on high levels of climate skepticism among TV weather forecasters might have seemed a... More

NYT’s Uncertain Trumpet on States’ Finances

The New York Times starts with a simple premise today: With many states facing debt problems like Greece did—big budget... More

Laurel to Denver’s Westword

For explaining how insurance companies behave

It was a riveting tale that reporter Alan Prendergast told in Westword, the Denver alternative weekly. Graphically and methodically, he... More

Was the Citi Bailout Really a Good Deal?

Dean Baker pointed out a myopic Washington Post story on Saturday reporting that the Treasury will make a several-billion-dollar profit... More

The Devil in the Details, Part VII

Can insurers still dump you when you get sick?

Health reform is now the law of the land, and the 2,000 or so pages of the legislation contain lots... More

Repression Goes Digital

The Internet has become a chokepoint in the struggle for a free press

In what has been dubbed "The Twitter Revolution," citizens in Tehran since June have been documenting violence in the street... More

Audit Notes: Unfair Size Advantage, Bumped Down, WSJ Win

Reuters Breakingviews finds another unfair advantage for the too-big-to-fail banks: They're paying less interest for deposits than their smaller competitors—a... More

Audit D.C. Notes: The FT Talks Turkey Lamb in Greece; Bloomberg Flexes Its Bond Stuff; NYT on Overqualified and Employed

There’s nothing better on a big, complicated story like the Greek debt crisis than heading out for a walk and... More

Meat vs. Miles

Coverage of livestock, transportation emissions hypes controversy

For the last four years, media outlets such as The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, and Fox News... More

Exclusive

When a list doesn’t include everything

The newspaper reported a burglary, and said that “four items were taken, including a DVD player, a laptop computer, an... More

Coverage of Tea Parties Evolves With the Movement

The tea party movement is just over a year old, and it’s good to see the press’s coverage mature along... More

A Nascent Press in North Korea?

The front page of today’s New York Times features a fascinating story about new efforts to get information out of... More

Getting Foxy with Sulzberger at the WSJ

Vanity Fair's Michael Wolff reeled in a stunner this weekend from The Wall Street Journal: Well, on the front page... More

The WSJ’s Confusing Subscription Prices

I wrote yesterday that The Wall Street Journal's iPad pricing doesn't make sense. The paper will charge $17.99 a month... More

Out on a Limb

The problems with that ‘wingnuts’ poll

In the course of surfing the Web last week, you may have come across some polling data showing that large... More

Audit Notes: Predators on the Block, iPad Pushback, Reuters on Toyota

The Wall Street Journal has a nice story about how slow-going it's been slimming down Citigroup. But what struck me... More

Audit D.C. Notes: Newsweek Says Cash Is King; TNR on the Politico Way; Weird FT Art

Cash is king, and that’s a good thing, declares Newsweek in an assessment of the “drastic debt diet” the U.S.... More

The Dead Go On the Record in The Wall Street Journal

The paper held Apple director’s newsmaking comments until after his death

A Wall Street Journal story yesterday on the death of Apple director Jerome York quoted eye-opening remarks York made to... More

What About Private Equity?

The industry is getting off easy while it destroys companies and jobs

This from The Wall Street Journal's Overheard on the Street is the stat of the day (okay, it ran yesterday):... More

Because It’s Friday…

At Time's "Swampland" blog, Karen Tumulty shares a classic Monty Python skit which, as she says, "is a perfect encapsulation... More

At Last, the Press Discovers the Consumer Story

How will health reform affect you and me?

A few days ago I stopped by a medical clinic in Greenwich Village; the waiting room was abuzz with talk... More

Justice Says Wall Street Colluded to Gouge Cities and States

Bloomberg scoops (and Dow Jones follows without crediting) that the Justice Department says JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America, and General... More

Texas Tornado

A one-woman show resurrects the late Molly Ivins

One-person shows are tricky things, demanding for both actor and audience. The playwright’s almost insurmountable challenge is to create a... More

Russian Honeypot

Micheal Idov of The Daily Beast has an alternately funny and chilling--but really, mostly chilling--tale of how several men who've... More

You’re Reading a Winner

CJR takes the Bart Richards Award for Media Criticism

We are happy to report that the Columbia Journalism Review is this year’s winner of the Bart Richards Award for... More

Audit Notes: Cramer Creamed, Elizabeth Warren, BofA Mods

Reason No. 5 billion not to listen to Jim Cramer or other market snake-oil salesmen: Jim Cramer said on CNBC's... More

Congressional Transparency Caucus Launched

Today Mike Quigley (D-IL) and Darrell Issa (R-CA) launched a new bipartisan Congressional Transparency caucus. Quigley's office has a seven... More

MoJo on Waste in Military Contracts

In a story today for Mother Jones, Adam Weinstein spotlights what sounds like a deficit reduction opportunity: It was just... More

No Handouts

White House photographers bridle at restricted access

In July 2005, the White House News Photographers Association took a big step. The Bush administration, much more so than... More

The Times Goes Big, and Only a Little Scary, on Social Security

Ten days ago, the AP reported that Social Security “is projected to pay out more in benefits than it collects... More

From Gumshoe to Google Wave

Investigative journalism goes multimedia

CAMBRIDGE, Mass.—While investigative journalism still requires old-school skills like stakeouts, meetings with confidential sources, and painstaking scrutiny of documents obtained... More

LA Times Sees an Oncoming Option ARM Wave

The Los Angeles Times looks at the possible impending Option-ARM crisis, something we've asked for more coverage of for a... More

The Clergy Abuse Story Comes Back to the U.S.

Talk about uncanny timing. Yesterday, ProPublica’s new reporter-blogger, Marian Wang, interviewed Walter Robinson, the former Boston Globe investigative journalist who... More

Newspaper Ads Tumbled to 1963 Levels Last Year

But iPad ads show an early glimmer of hope

The New York Times reports that newspaper advertising tanked by more than 27 percent last year, shedding $10 billion from... More

Darts and Laurels

A paper in the Midwest exposes a scandal. Thirty years later, it does it again.

In 1979, Des Moines Register reporters Mike McGraw and Margaret Engel discovered sixty mentally disabled men eviscerating turkeys at an... More

Audit Notes: Tax Break, Lehman CEO, WSJ Sports

The Journal is good to front a story on tax goodies for corporations, noting that JPMorgan Chase is about to... More

Audit D.C. Notes: Kinsley v. Krugman v. Kinsley v….; the Post on Upping Exports; Boutique Bats

A lot of journalism is just asking the big, dumb question, and Michael Kinsley did a good job of that... More

Too Big to Fail and Reform

Simon Johnson of Baseline Scenario points to a tough amendment to the not-so-tough Dodd financial-reform bill (so not-so-tough, in fact,... More

More on Polarization, and on Knowing Where to Look

My Campaign Desk item earlier today took issue with Tom Friedman’s argument that gerrymandered legislative districts are driving polarization in... More

The Health Reform Vote on Cable News

At The Monkey Cage, Patrick Egan has put together a nice chart showing viewership of the cable news networks on... More

A Fresh Angle on Health Care? Leonhardt Delivers

We’ve given the Times’s David Leonhardt credit before for economic writing that threads the tricky “news analysis” needle, and, in... More

Strange Medicine

Tom Friedman’s peculiar cures for our ailing politics

Like a lot of people, Tom Friedman is upset that American politics is “broken.” Unlike a lot of people, he... More

Cornell and Kentucky: A Study in Contrasts

This Thursday night, the Cornell Big Red will play the Kentucky Wildcats in a men's NCAA basketball tournament matchup that... More

The Long Short

Bloomberg has an interesting tale about hedge-fund biggie Bill Ackman's "greatest short ever," in an excerpt of a forthcoming book... More

Audit Notes: Hapless SEC, Murdoch’s Mega-Losses, BofA Repo 105

Just when you thought your opinion of the SEC couldn't get any lower, the Washington Post goes and looks at... More

Things to Keep in the Back of Your Mind…

… while reading the many stories out now, and the many more sure to come, that try to gauge the... More

Washington Post Plays “What If”

Cillizza: Would Obama be better off if the GOP controlled Congress?

On the day that Barack Obama signed into law a major overhaul of the health care system, thus fulfilling a... More

Into the Woods

If you were to interview Tiger Woods, what would you ask him?

For the first time since the sex scandal that upended his personal and professional life in November, Tiger Woods gave... More

What an adjective!

If you've been on the internet this afternoon--and not under a rock or something--I'm sure you've by now seen the... More

Fox and the GOP: Who’s Working for Whom?

Via Media Matters, former-Bush-speechwriter-turned-iconoclast-conservative David Frum appeared on ABC’s Nightline last night to discuss the politics of health care. Frum,... More

Stories Percolate on World Water Day

National Geographic dives in with special issue

By 2025, 1.8 billion people are expected to live in areas where water is scarce—a prediction, among many troubling others,... More

Bob Reich on the What-It-All Means Question

No paw prints of the Great Society here

In a column yesterday on Talking Points Memo, former Secretary of Labor Bob Reich got to an issue that has... More

An Rx for Reporting

Yesterday’s strategies failed on the health-reform story. Now what?

Just before Christmas, a CNN poll asked Americans whether they favored or opposed the health-reform bills moving through Congress. Forty-two... More

Wall Street Stayed Put Despite Pay Fixes

Wall Street is a slippery beast. Whenever it's faced with the prospect of regulatory circumscription, it threatens to take its... More

The Unconquered

A grassroots effort to keep journalism’s mission alive

In late October 2005, Dan Grech returned home to Miami after two months spent covering the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina... More

Audit Notes: Greenspan’s Gall, Presidentializing Markets, Megabanks

Barry Ritholtz wrote an excellent post explaining to Alan Greenspan why, yes, his low-interest-rate policies were critical in the creation... More

Calderone: Weigel to Post

Ten days ago, in the course of chiding The Washington Post for being slow to the Tea Party story, I... More

Probably Likely

A change that likely needs making

Now that the health care bill is through Congress, President Obama “likely” will sign it soon, opponents “likely” will challenge... More

Murdoch’s Unhealthy Obsession

Taking on The New York Times isn’t risk-free for the Journal

Richard Pérez-Peña has several interesting bits in his piece on the soon-to-commence Battle for New York between his own New... More

Presidents and Polarization

Our roundup of health care headlines this morning noted that one of the major themes of the coverage has been... More

A P.S. on WellPoint

Deconstructing the insurer’s grassroots campaign

Let it be known to friend and foe alike that WellPoint was at the health reform table. The ill-timed rate... More

WaPo’s Divorce-in-the-Downturn Story Needs Data Injection

The Washington Post takes a longish look at another slice of life in the downturn: divorce. This is a story... More

Delacorte Lecture with Peggy Northrop

Watch the Reader’s Digest editor’s Delacorte Lecture here

On March 10, 2010, Reader's Digest editor-in-chief Peggy Northrop delivered a Delacorte Lecture at the Columbia University Graduate School of... More

Historic Change, Divided Politics

Rounding up major outlets’ first reactions to the House health reform outcome

In the wake of last night’s vote in the House to approve a major overhaul of the nation's health-care system,... More

The Meaning of Those CBO Numbers

Smoke and mirrors and the doctor fix

Congressional Budget Office (CBO) numbers released at the end of last week gave the House Democrats the ammo they were... More

Audit Notes: Better Cohan, Ernst Whopper, WSJ Walkback

I was highly critical of a William D. Cohan piece in the Times two weeks ago pleading for mercy for... More

Pittman-Bloomberg Fed Lawsuit Scores Again

Bloomberg has won another victory in its battle to force the Federal Reserve to reveal details of its multi-trillion-dollar bailouts—ones... More

The TAO of Journalism

A seal program promoting transparency, accountability, and openness

It started, as many things do in journalism, with a pen and paper. Close to three years ago at a... More

Social Security’s Code Words

Erskine Bowles takes the stage

Those who consider themselves Social Security mavens know the name Erskine Bowles. Bill Clinton’s former chief of staff, and currently... More

Scoring the CBO Score

Amid all the spinning and sparring over the Congressional Budget Office’s assessment of health care legislation, a couple of stories... More

Newser, The Fly on the Wall, and Aggregation

Rarely will you see an aggregator state his business model so forthrightly as Michael Wolff, founder of Newser, does today... More

Audit Notes: Hiltzik on Lehman, Regulator Bonuses, iPad Ads

Los Angeles Times columnist Michael Hiltzik pulls a non-Repo 105 angle out of the Valukas Report on Lehman Brothers' collapse:... More

Another New York Judge Embarrasses the SEC

Will Judge William Pauley III now join Judge Jed Rakoff as one of the few heroes of the crisis? The... More

The End of The Ether

This week C-SPAN launched a full searchable online video library, dating to twenty-three years ago. But let’s go a bit... More

Tax Talk

It might not be a full-fledged meme change, but the idea that tax increases could really be on tap has... More

Hooking the Big Ones

Matt Labash’s meetings with remarkable men

Fly Fishing with Darth Vader: And Other Adventures with Evangelical Wrestlers, Political Hitmen, and Jewish Cowboys | By Matt Labash... More

Problems in an NYT Column

The paper quoted anonymous sources on a Lehman whistleblower but offered no chance for a response

There are some real journalistic lapses in a New York Times column Tuesday that quoted anonymous sources about a Lehman... More

The Education of Herb And Marion Sandler

When two patrons of aggressive journalism became its targets, they cried foul. They have a point.

As of July 16, 2010, the end of this story has been updated with new information about Paul Bishop's wrongful... More

Audit Notes (All-Lehman Edition): Round-Trip, Clueless, Felix on Fire

Francine McKenna of Re: The Auditors weighs in on the Chittum/Carney fracas over Lehman prosecutions. She's on the side of... More

Reuters Is Excellent in Digging Up a Health Insurer’s Tactics

Reuters has an eye-opening investigation today showing how the health-insurance company Assurant Health (formerly called Fortis) systematically targeted sick patients... More

Audit D.C. Notes: The Post on Chamber Politics, Roll Call on K St. Pay, Hoop Dreams

The Chamber of Commerce, that under-covered business behemoth, gets welcome attention from The Washington Post, which reports on the group’s... More

Parsing the AP’s Health Care Primer

Its attempt at informing falls short

The Associated Press has been an important voice in the health care debate. So it was disappointing to see its... More

Top Secret: The Battle for the Pentagon Papers

A clip from the recent CJR panel discussion

On March 16, 2010, the Columbia Journalism Review hosted a benefit performance of the play Top Secret: The Battle for... More

Wise Words

From Jack Shafer: In a perfect world, a publication is edited for readers. In the imperfect world that we inhabit,... More

CBS Throws Debt Numbers Against Wall

CBS News is getting a lot of diggs, tweets and shares for its story on the latest national debt numbers... More

WSJ on a New Municipal “Move Your Money” Push

The Wall Street Journal has an excellent story this morning on a nascent trend among municipalities to put their money... More

Audit Notes: Battle of NYC, Fed, Complexity, Big Mac Subsidies

About the last thing we need now is a newspaper war, but Rupert Murdoch is Rupert Murdoch, so here we... More

Audit D.C. Notes: The FT Looks at the Lobbyist Set; WSJ on Credit Agencies, NPR on the Dow, Etc.

The Financial Times takes a look something that all too often gets treated like wallpaper in Washington, the persistent power... More

He-Said, She-Said on Medicare

The Times gets stuck on the surface of the Medicare debate

The dispatch from Strongsville, Ohio in today’s New York Times, about Barack Obama’s efforts to rally public support for his... More

“We felt a lot better once we got back to camp and had a cup of tea.”

Here's some captivating video of what it's like to come under fire when embedded on patrol in Afghanistan from Stuart... More

When the Well Runs Dry

Is Duke Energy’s support for a new SciTech section a problem?

Last week, CJR’s online science desk, The Observatory, ran a story about the launch of a new weekly science and... More

Reporting from the Examining Room

The New York Times gets credit for going where few bother, into the examining rooms of doctors who see Medicaid... More

The President Pushes against Waste, Fraud, and Abuse

But what do those terms really mean?

The president has a sales job to do if he wants the American people to get behind whatever reform emerges... More

Why So Serious?

Parsing the Post’s piece on Obama’s “happiness deficit”

The editorial page of The Washington Post has a well-established reputation for its hawkish stance on fiscal matters, so it... More

Leeway for Lehman Brothers

Clusterstock’s Carney trips all over himself arguing against prosecutions

I suppose we shouldn't be surprised that John Carney thinks "We Should Not Criminally Prosecute Lehman Executives." After all, this... More

An Icon Fades

Ebony shaped the black middle class, then misread its digital moment

Ebony magazine, the African-American monthly, has been a beloved institution in black America for more than sixty years. These days... More

Audit Notes: Strong Leder, Online Ads, CNBC Deathmatch

The Wall Street Journal has a very good leder today looking at how the dearth of credit is crimping... More

Blogs Beat the Press on the Lehman Brothers Scandal

And just like that the Lehman Brothers scandal drops off the front pages. And not just the front pages—the section... More

Audit D.C. Notes: NYT Does Well at (Trade) School; WaPo on Earmarks, Squeezed in Ypsilanti, Etc.

The New York Times continues its excellent series on “The New Poor” with a look at the for-profit colleges and... More

Bad News

Howard Rheingold sees a critical need for critical thinking

They went looking for crap, and by golly they found plenty of it. Students in Howard Rheingold’s journalism class at... More

China Stories: Good, Bad, Indifferent

There’s unusual depth to today’s flurry of China coverage, and that’s a good thing—mostly. The New York Times gets the... More

Your Deal

Confusing a ‘card shark’ with a ‘cardsharp’

You’re in Vegas, putting your poker skills to the test. As you are raking in the chips from a particularly... More

Is the Past Prologue?

The pedigree of Alan Simpson

Before too many weeks pass, I want to comment on an illuminating Gray Matters column by Saul Friedman, an old... More

State of the Media, By the Numbers

Seven notable stats from the Pew State of the Media report

The annual State of the Media report by the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism was released this... More

Michael Lewis Drops Some Wisdom on Wall Street

I haven't read Michael Lewis's sure-to-be blockbuster The Big Short yet, but everybody ought to watch his appearance on 60... More

Comments of the Week

March 8-12, 2010

At the end of each week, we excerpt some of the most insightful, articulate, interesting, and entertaining comments we’ve received... More

Audit Notes: Google “Grandeur,” Toxic Pet, Stop the Presses?

Valleywag's Ryan Tate hammers Google about its "Six Delusions of Grandeur." Tate points to this stunning quote in Fortune from... More

How to Cover a Non-Story

The Globe knew about that Scott Brown lawsuit—and passed

On Thursday afternoon, Gawker reported that Scott Brown—the Republican whose victory in a special election in Massachusetts has cost Democrats... More

The Lehman Scandal Breaks Wide Open

Will Repo 105 be the Chewco and JEDI of this crisis, and are we finally about to see some people... More

If Democrats do not contribute to the Greg Marx Retirement Fund, midterms will be costly

I’m not going to attempt to dissect each of the arguments made by Patrick Caddell and Douglas Schoen in their... More

A Late Arrival to the Party

Over at Politico, Mike Calderone reports that The Washington Post will be stepping up its Tea Party coverage. Local writers... More

Le Nouvelliste Returns

Haiti’s oldest newspaper comes back to life

PORT-AU-PRINCE – Haiti’s oldest newspaper, Le Nouvelliste, is reviving gradually. The publication was out of action for more than a... More

Audit Notes: Investigative Budgets, Cable BS, The Audit Outsourced

Amount the Lehman Brothers court examiner spent to investigate that single company: $38 million. Amount Congress has budgeted for the... More

The Really Real S&P 500

I wrote a post called "The Real Dow" a couple of months ago about how the press almost always fails... More

Reviving Science Coverage in the Carolinas

Weekly newspaper section, community-journalism project deliver fresh content

At a time when weekly newspaper science sections are as rare as a single top quark, two North Carolina newspapers... More

Zonied Out

Adam Klawonn tried everything to make his journalism startup succeed. It wasn’t enough.

In 2006, Adam Klawonn cashed out his newspaper job vacation pay to reinvent himself as a digital journalist. He bought... More

Medicare Kicks Out Fox Insurance

And therein lie some lessons for the press

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) took strong action the other day when it kicked Fox Insurance out... More

Gensler, Derivatives, and the Causes of the Crisis

A Times story brings up several critical points for coverage of Wall Street and reform

The New York Times profiles Gary Gensler, the Goldman alum and former deregulation advocate who's now pursuing reform with the... More

Limiting Sunshine

Florida quite famously has one of the nation's most expansive public records access laws. And it's not uncommon for such... More

The Price of Admission

Andrew Ross Sorkin’s debut and the limits of access journalism

Too Big to Fail: The Inside Story of How Wall Street and Washington Fought to Save the Financial System—and Themselves... More

Audit Notes: FT “News,” Overdrafts Over at BofA, No Marketwatchdog

There they go again. The Financial Times has a scoop so big it thought it decided we media types couldn't... More

Said What?

The perils of relying on prepared remarks. HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius appeared before a group of insurance executives today, ready... More

When a Story Comes Along, Must You Whip It?

Competing approaches to covering the legislative endgame

Since it became clear sometime during the past few weeks that the fate of health care reform rests in the... More

What Was Sebelius Saying?

David Gregory didn’t probe too deeply

The president and his staff have brought us to the stump-speech stage of health reform: the familiar talking points, the... More

Audit D.C. Notes: WSJ Good on Wall Street Muni Fees; Newsweek on Design, Bloomberg Goes Contrarian on Obama, Etc.

The Wall Street Journal digs into Build America Bonds, enacted as part of last year’s stimulus plan “to create jobs... More

Cranston Attorney Now a Journal Star

It's probably a bad sign if you're a Rhode Island lawyer who's the subject of two page-one Wall Street Journal... More

“Rejuvenating American Journalism”

What the FTC will hear today from Robert McChesney

Among those who care about serious journalism, some are counting on an economic comeback that will bring sufficient media advertising... More

Remembering Where People Get Their News

Riffing off of Kevin Drum’s post about Terry McDermott’s cover story about Fox News in the latest CJR (which you... More

Times Peeks Inside CFPA Dealmaking

The New York Times has a great scoop on the making of the Consumer Financial Protection Agency bill sausage. No... More

Audit Notes: Sorkin GOP, Multi-Task Meacham, Salmon, Simon

Andrew Ross Sorkin dips his toe into political commentary today in his DealBook column. Maybe he should stick to mergers:... More

Big Money, No Funny

I get that everybody's trying to hop on the video bandwagon now since ad CPMs are so much higher than... More

Credit Cards, Credit Scores, and Citigroup

In case you didn't know it—the banks still have you over a barrel. David Lazarus of the Los Angeles Times... More

Rahm, Off the Record

How much should you talk to someone off-record if they refuse to go on?

The latest installment in the media’s long-running series of articles about Rahm Emanuel is also the lengthiest: Peter Baker’s profile... More

Joe the Plumber, You’ve Got Company

In an entirely unsurprising development, Charlie Crist is trying to capitalize on the Marco Rubio haircut story to claim the... More

A Weak Excuse for an Unemployment Story

The Washington Post takes some Senate bait for its page-one story about the long-term unemployed, and the result, is, well,... More

Monitor-ing the Environment

The CSM cancels green blog in favor of a broader approach

In recent years, blogs have become a popular way for newspapers to handle specialized topics like science and the environment.... More

Dumb Like a Fox

Fox News isn’t part of the GOP; it has simply (and shamelessly) mastered the confines of cable

Last December 10 was a big news day. U.S. Senate negotiators announced they had agreed to a compromise on health... More

Lowenstein’s Consumer Protection Stinker

Faulty logic and a false choice on banks

Roger Lowenstein is too contrarian for his own good with his latest Bloomberg column. He writes that "Smart Banks With... More

Audit Notes: Glades Crusade, Greenspan Deflects, Whatever Happened to…?

The New York Times's excellent investigation into Florida's deal for thousands of acres in the Everglades finds an awful lot... More

Bloomberg Shows Banks Teetering with Market Prices

Some good reporting by Bloomberg today shows how the banking system is dependent on make-believe accounting to help prop it... More

Strategic Error

Times Axelrod profile gets mixed up on messaging

Mark Leibovich’s front-page piece on the sufferings of David Axelrod in Sunday’s New York Times—the press apparently having decided to... More

No Lectures, Please

‘Podium’ and ‘lectern’ are often interchangeable

There’s an old joke among journalists—OK, mostly among copy editors—about a passage that says that the speaker “stood behind the... More

Delacorte Lecture with Adam Pitluk

Watch the American Way editor’s Delacorte Lecture here

On February 24, 2010, American Way editor Adam Pitluk delivered a Delacorte Lecture at the Columbia University Graduate School of... More

Regulating Health Care, Part III

When is an insurance company too small to cover?

The pols and the advocacy groups have told us for months that health reform is supposed to produce tighter regulation... More

Before Preemption There Was Riegle-Neal

That may be the least-SEO-friendly headline of all time, but hey, we're not the Huffington Post! This from the Journal's... More

Comments of the Week

March 1-5, 2010

At the end of each week, we excerpt some of the most insightful, articulate, interesting, and entertaining comments we’ve received... More

Audit Notes: God of Journalism, Pandit Panned, Wolff’s Own Medicine

The new-hire newsroom memo has long been a hotbed of puffery—a place where journalists consistently put aside their cynicism and... More

Audit D.C. Notes: Medicaid, Rest Stops, Galbraith, Etc.

The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities previews the upcoming congressional debate over whether to extend the federal support for... More

More Fun With Headlines

Earlier today, Clint flagged this gem of headline word-smithery. Well, here is another chuckler, noteworthy for the very lack of... More

Carrying Water for White-Collar Criminals

William D. Cohan pleads for a Goldman convict to be pardoned

Edward Ericson Jr. of Baltimore City Paper points us to a long, weird William D. Cohan blog piece at New... More

RadarOnline, Consider Yourself Warned

At The Monkey Cage, John Sides flags the fascinating Above the Law item that details how those short-lived "John Roberts... More

Rent a Newspaper Flack

Print subscribers to the Los Angeles Times awoke this morning to find this where the front page—you know, the one... More

Support for WSJ’s Jobs Optimism is Thin

There’s plenty of green-shoot glory in the Journal’s Ahead of the Tape column, which uses accelerating corporate profits to help... More

I Heart T-Shirts About Journalism

For all you journalists out there who can get away with wearing T-shirts to work. More

Meet Retracto

Introducing Andrew Breitbart’s “correction alpaca”

Andrew Breitbart is well on his way to building an online media empire to call his own. I’d call him... More

Ripe Headline

Here's how the the Kansas City Star's Crime Scene KC blog headlined a post about a man heading to prison... More

Revisiting That Hyped WSJ Hedge-Fund Story

Last week, The Wall Street Journal ran an odd story on its front page headlined "Hedge Funds Pound Euro"—something Felix... More

Audit Notes: Bennett on Health Care, Fortune, WaPo Digital, Facebook

Bloomberg editor Amanda Bennett has a remarkable story today recounting her husband's battle with cancer, how much it cost to... More

Press Forward: Authority and Credibility

The latest entries in CJR’s “Press Forward: Dialogues on the Future of News” series

Who Says - Megan Garber on narrative authority in a fragmented world Trust Falls – Justin Peters on lessons from... More

TNR on Obama and Regulation

Secretary of Audit Dean Starkman has often criticized the press for its lackluster coverage of regulation, while acknowledging that it's... More

Who Says

Narrative authority in a fragmented world

Great is Journalism. Is not every Able Editor a Ruler of the World, being a persuader of it?— Thomas Carlyle,... More

Trust Falls

Lessons from St. Louis on authority, credibility, and online communications

In November of 2009, an editor at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch decided to show his readers who was boss. After... More

Who Says: Further Reading

Roland Barthes’s “The Death of the Author” is a classic in postmodern thought, and it underscores many of the ideas... More

Trust Falls: Further Reading

Imaginary Futures: From Thinking Machines to the Global Village, by Richard Barbrook, examines the political ideology of the Internet, from... More

Stiglitz, Wolf, Pearlstein, Huffington: Media & Economics Conference, April 6

RSVP Now

A day-long conference on Columbia University's campus will explore the problems and opportunities posed by reporting on a financial... More

How Will the End of Print Affect Old Loons Who Hoard Newspapers?

Count on my old friends at the Onion News Network to ask the really tough questions: How Will The End... More

Bad Diagnoses

The recent ‘Rahm’ stories offer plenty of prescriptions. Are we sure Obama is sick?

As my colleague Holly Yeager noted the other day, the spate of Rahm Emanuel stories that have lately been clogging... More

NYT’s Rose-Colored Small Biz Scenario

The New York Times paints an awfully pretty picture of older workers who decide to launch their own businesses. Trouble... More

The Perils of Reporting from Gaza

Gaza journalists hopeful that press freedoms will persist

On February 14 in the Gaza Strip, Hamas arrested Paul Martin, a British documentary filmmaker, on suspicions that Martin had... More

China Daily has set up its biggest team yet to cover this important event.”

What important event, you ask? Some industrial scandal? Unrest in western provinces? Nope. The important event worthy of full court... More

NPR Amps Up

Can Vivian Schiller build a journalism juggernaut?

If I were writing this story for All Things Considered, I might open with some audio: the sound of applause.... More

CNBC Millionaires Don’t Believe in Predatory Lending

Barry Ritholtz points to this ludicrous CNBC segment where everyone gangs up on Janet Tavakoli for pointing out the obvious:... More

Audit Notes: Monopoly Culture, Health Care, SNLers on CFPA

Thomas Frank reviews an interesting-looking book on monopolies in the American economy—one that argues that there are more than you... More

Whither the Watershed

A field guide to environmental journalism in the Ohio River Valley

Last weekend, the monstrous snowstorm that walloped the northeast prevented me from attending an event that I’d been looking forward... More

The NYT Muffs the Second-Day Fed-CFPA Story

The New York Times tries to play catch-up on the proposal to put the Consumer Financial Protection Agency inside the... More

Meme Change

It looks like an economic meme change is on the way, with some thoughtful columnists charting the course. The Times’s... More

Health Reform Lessons from Massachusetts, Part X

Unintended consequences for low-income workers

Four years ago, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts enacted a far-reaching health reform law that politicians and the media hailed as... More

Corporate Welfare Columns, Yea and Nay

The Washington Post's Steven Pearlstein takes on corporate welfare at the local level today and shows how such a column... More

Statement, no longer operative

This morning's print New York Times carried the following paragraphs in an article on whether or not Congressman Charlie Rangel... More

Audit Notes: Deflation, SEC Wrist Slap, ARMs

It seems odd that the press hasn't written more about the threat of deflation. Paul Krugman, no inflation hawk he,... More

Audit D.C. Notes: Collender on reconciliation; WSJ on stalled jobs

--Stan Collender shows why he’s considered one of Washington’s brighter budget bulbs, with a Roll Call column that explains why... More

The Atlantic Tweaks its Web Redesign

The site responds to complaints from its readers—and its own bloggers

At 1 a.m. last Friday, TheAtlantic.com rolled out a much-anticipated new redesign. By 4 p.m. Monday, the redesign had already... More

Lessons in Rahmology

The arc of a who’s-up, who’s-down story

The Washington Post gives White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel the page-one attention that befits this big personality with... More

Newspapers’ Online Ads Are Worse Than You Think

Martin Langeveld points out something interesting in Scripps's fourth-quarter earnings: Those already-dismal online advertising numbers you've seen for newspapers? They're... More

Shhh! It’s a Secret!

This made the rounds among journo-types yesterday, but in case you haven’t seen it, there’s an exciting development in the... More

A Political Scientist Encounters Quote Bubble Journalism

Henry Farrell, a professor of political science at George Washington University and a blogger at both Crooked Timber and The... More

Incomplete

Why use “completely”?

“Completely” is probably one of the most completely superfluous words in the English language. Too often, it’s used to emphasize... More

Breaking Out the Wite-Out

Distressing data from a new CJR report

The new CJR survey on the practices of magazine Web sites (read it here!) contains lots of interesting information, but... More

Delacorte Lecture with Chris Dixon

Watch the New York art director’s Delacorte Lecture here

On February 17, 2010, New York art director Chris Dixon delivered a Delacorte Lecture at the Columbia University Graduate School... More

Small Change

The Wall Street Journal team that’s been looking into the use and abuse of Congressional perks has a story today... More

Differing Takes on Reconciliation

Finding the soundbites, and missing the meaning, in Kent Conrad’s remarks

Stenography-as-reporting tends to get a bad name because it allows politicians to say false or misleading things without being held... More

Too Much Information?

The release of battle footage sparks a controversy in Norway

It is New Year’s Eve in northern Afghanistan. A small group of Norwegian soldiers is en route to meet... More

Carlson Calling

Tucker Carlson talks about his new online enterprise

Earlier this year, Tucker Carlson’s already long and varied journalistic résumé added a new entry: Web impresario. In January, the... More

Fed Up, Consumers Down

The Federal Reserve isn't exactly known as a friend of the little guy. And for good reason. So it borders... More

Audit Notes: CDS Ban, WSJ v. NYT, A No-Layoffs Policy

Wolfgang Munchau asks in the Financial Times why it's still legal to buy credit-default swaps when you don't own the... More

The Unemployed on the Payday Loan Treadmill

The Los Angeles Times reports that payday lenders are feasting on the jobless, taking huge chunks of their unemployment checks... More

Perspective, Please, on China

The New York Times added to the unstoppable-China meta-narrative over the weekend with an interesting report from the country’s industrial... More

Magazines and Their Web Sites

A Columbia Journalism Review survey and report

CJR recently conducted a survey of standards and practices at magazine Web sites. The full report can be viewed here.... More

The Cost of Living, Part III

Are the docs really going to drop their patients?

Containing the runaway cost of medical care is the thorniest of all the thorny issues in the health-reform debate. There’s... More

Breakingviews Says This Out of Love, Goldman

Shorter Reuters Breakingviews: "The great Goldman Sachs, despite its greatness, should apologize for not living up to its higher standards... More

Tangled Web

A CJR survey finds that magazines are allowing their Web sites to erode journalistic standards

An article about a new CJR survey of practices at magazine Web sites that was published in the March/April issue... More

It doesn’t add up - A science writer questions the conventional wisdom of US-born STEM workers

#Realtalk: Dear reader - For small sites, loyalty might be a better path to pageviews

Falling for internet hoaxes - Some people who share satire don’t realize they’re missing the punchline

Digital First plans layoffs (Updated) - High-level executives and high-profile digital projects targeted

Nobody’s that lucky’—except in Florida’s lottery? - Palm Beach Post ferrets out lottery fraud, prompts tightening of “meager” safeguards


The future of Facebook may not say ‘Facebook’

The future of the social network is apps—lots and lots of apps

Bitcoin creator ‘Satoshi Nakamoto’ unmasked-again?

A linguistics analysis suggests that Nick Szabo, a well known name in cryptography circles, is the mysterious father of the digital currency

The Center for Public Integrity’s response to ABC News

“I urge you to go to your reporters and engage in serious self-examination”

The slaughter bench of history

How war has made the world safer and richer

New Jersey’s good government

Despite the bridge scandal, Chris Christie’s state is relatively transparent and accountable. CJR’s Greg Marx talks to Gordon Witkin

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Who Owns What

The Business of Digital Journalism

A report from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Study Guides

Questions and exercises for journalism students.