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Articles by Curtis Brainard | Email the Author

EPA Ruling Sets an Ambitious Menu For the Press

As “triumphant” as Monday’s decision may be for environmentalists, for the press the story is just beginning.

On Monday, the Supreme Court ruled that the Environmental Protection Agency has the authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from... More

For ABC, Weather Equals Climate Change

ABCNews.com featured a poll Wednesday that was so egregiously nitwitted that it deserves comment.

We usually ignore inane network online news polls that ask readers to weigh in on current debates by clicking on... More

Scientific American’s Experiment in Wiki-Reporting

When the news of the oldest hominid fossil on record broke this fall, the magazine’s lineup was packed — so its editors tried an experiment they had been kicking around for months.

In September, a team of scientists, led by paleoanthropologist Zeresenay Alemseged, announced the results of a study on the 3.3-million-year-old... More

A Syndicated Column Preaches Beyond the Green Choir

Doug Moss, editor of E — The Environment Magazine, talks about how to present environmental and scientific issues to the public, and promoting his magazine.

"EarthTalk," a weekly, syndicated, Q&A-style column about the environment, might seem a little earthy-crunchy at first. Its publisher, E --... More

Murdoch Goes Green, and His Empire Follows

Rupert Murdoch, traditionally no friend to the science of climate change, has begun to change his tune, will NewsCorp?

It was like the sun rising in the west. For over a decade, Rupert Murdoch had disputed the science of... More

In the U.K., a Bang; In the U.S., Whimper

There are roughly 3,500 miles between Washington, D.C. and London. For journalists, those miles might as well be light years.

There are roughly 3,500 miles between Washington, D.C. and London -- for journalists, those miles might as well be light... More

Reporters Turn Ghostbusters for Halloween

Surprising, but true: A smattering of reporters managed to ditch the lame cliches of writing about Halloween to actually do some timely reporting.

For at least three Octobers now, reporters have littered newspaper pages with stories about the worrisome rise in "sexy" Halloween... More

God Versus Science — Back in the News

A new book about religious belief has been burning up the pages of newspapers and magazines lately, and the outlook for a peaceful solution looks bleak.

God versus science is back in the news -- again. As sure as Newton's Third Law of Motion, that every... More

Half Full or Half Empty? U.S. Glass has 300 Million Drops of Water

As the United States population reached 300 million early this morning, reporters took the opportunity to provide a State of the Union address of sorts.

Look into the melting pot and describe what you see. That was the challenge confronting journalists as the United States... More

Inhofe, Climate Change and Those Alarmist Reporters

On Monday, Sen. James Inhofe railed against climate research and the scientific press. But untangling his arguments about bad science and bad reporting is a difficult task.

It's hard to tell what Senator James Inhofe loathes more: the scientific consensus that climate change poses serious threats, or... More

The AJC Takes the CDC’s Temperature

On Sunday, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution broke yet another solid investigative story about the Centers for Disease Control.

As Americans pick the spinach out of their salads and sandwiches, and patients contact doctors to ask if there will... More

A Reporting Error Frozen in Time?

Writing about issues such as global warming is complicated, and too few reporters brush up on their science when doing so.

Science writers often face the same technical difficulty as foreign correspondents -- their sources speak a different language. In the... More

The Economist Wants to Put Greenbacks Behind Green Industry

In presenting the story of global warming, the convention of providing journalistic “balance” runs up against its logical limit.

"The Heat is On," says The Economist. The warning is emblazoned on the magazine's Sept. 9 cover, over a photograph... More

Stop trolling your readers - We know you’re only doing it for clicks

Des Moines Register prepares for a ‘very stressful’ newsroom restructuring - Editor Amalie Nash speaks on turnover, transformation, and a virtual reality adventure

PBS pulls ads from Harper’s Magazine after critical essay - Piece argues public broadcaster has fallen under the sway of political influence and outside money

Should all journalists be on Twitter? - Reasons to take up or forgo the 140-character platform

The Tennessean is borrowing reporters from other Gannett papers - Music columnist Peter Cooper is latest journalist to part ways with Nashville paper


How one reporter copes inside the ‘Ebola bubble’ (BuzzFeed)

“Bring gloves to give nurses you meet at clinics, even if you’re there for a story. Get small change to give to the kids who have been out of school for months and are selling ground nuts for pitiful sums on the side of road. Hell, give them candy. Violate all the principles of ostensibly good aid stewardship, because the good stewardship of the developed world didn’t get help here in time, and now everyone is dying around you.”

Fake news sites using Facebook to spread Ebola panic (The Verge)

“These sites claim to be satirical but lack even incompetent attempts at anything resembling humor”

How Ben Bradlee dealt with flacks (Washington Post)

“I would like to be sure that you understand that we trust our editors’ news judgement and that we distrust yours”

Ben Bradlee, 93 (WaPo)

“From the moment he took over The Post newsroom in 1965, Mr. Bradlee sought to create an important newspaper that would go far beyond the traditional model of a metropolitan daily”

Bloggingheads

Greg Marx discusses democracy and news with Tom Rosenstiel of the American Press Institute

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Who Owns What

The Business of Digital Journalism

A report from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Study Guides

Questions and exercises for journalism students.