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Articles by Trudy Lieberman | Email the Author

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‘Mediscare’ claims persist. Does calling them ‘debunked’ suffice?

A humble suggestion for reporters covering a recycled Medicare campaign claim

Well, what do you know. Republicans are trying their luck yet again with campaign ads telling voters that the Dems... More

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New York Times story questions Obamacare’s nursing-home ratings

Facilities have learned to game the system, so five stars may not mean much

Katie Thomas' piece in Monday's New York Times undermined what has become a pillar of the standard nursing-home story of... More

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The cost battle between insurers and hospitals spills into the press

In Nebraska, public radio captures the plight of the patients caught in the middle

It's not often that a nice succinct story about hospital consolidation, high out-of-pocket costs, and limitations on patient choice comes... More

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Medicare fraud stories ignore larger issues of reform

The problem is well-established; what to do about it is not

This has been a summer for Medicare fraud stories. In the past week alone, there were stories from The Wall... More

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Why did one regulator order a health insurer to set its rates higher?

An unusual case in Oregon draws some good coverage, and deserves sustained attention

A little drama over insurance rates came to a head earlier this week in Oregon, with a result you might... More

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How do you catch a candidate and pin him down?

MinnPost asked Sen. Al Franken’s challenger nine times what he’d do about Medicare and Social Security. The exchange is illuminating for reporters and voters.

Eric Black, a political columnist for MinnPost, offered a great example recently of how to pin down (or, at least,... More

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The Boston Globe owned the health policy beat once. Where did that tenacity go?

The paper’s coverage of big health news in Massachusetts is now too often ho-hum

As goes Massachusetts; so goes the nation--at least when it comes to healthcare. In 2009 and 2010, in the midst... More

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Dangerous drug side effects will no longer be secret in Canada

Kudos to the Toronto Star for dogged investigations and pressure on a reluctant government agency

Last fall on a visit to Canada, I spotted a first-rate piece in the Toronto Star by Diana Zlomislic,... More

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The Associated Press factchecks a couple ‘Mediscare’ ads in Kentucky

As the midterm campaign gets underway, some familiar talking points come out again

Bravo to The Associated Press! As soon as dueling ads for Kentucky Senator Mitch McConnell and his challenger in the... More

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Medicare isn’t doing its own ‘truth checking.’ Why?

Kudos to ProPublica for “Examining Medicare,” but there’s more to this story than the bad apples

In April, the Department of Health and Human Services released its great Medicare data dump unlocking a treasure chest of... More

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If it sounds ‘too good to be true…’

How Health News Florida flubbed the rate story last week and what all reporters can take away from it

Remember those seven tips I offered earlier this month for how to report on health insurance rate proposals? I have... More

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Six times Medicare caved

A pattern for reporters to dig in to

Reporters don't often cover the rule-making process that goes on at government agencies. If they do, they typically borrow from... More

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Investigating a $150 billion ‘black box’

CPI did stellar reporting on the Medicare Advantage “money grab,” despite agency stonewalling— here’s how others reporters can dig in

In a year-long investigation of Medicare Advantage (MA) plans, Fred Schulte, David Donald, Erin Durkin, and Chris Zubak-Skees of... More

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Sticking with Washington’s ‘whistleblower judge flap’

Puget Sound Business Journal’s Valerie Bauman reported the heck out of a state insurance commission saga—and the broader issue of narrow networks

There are different ways to tell the story of what's happening with Washington's insurance exchange, a state marketplace called... More

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Michigan’s Medicaid program is going to be great, say Michigan, Medicaid officials

Those claims deserve a closer look

A good piece from Kaiser Health News and USA Today this week about Michigan’s Medicaid expansion plan offers some pointers... More

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What’s health insurance really going to cost?

That’s the big question reporters must tackle, even as this year’s game of spin the rates takes off

Let the game begin! The game of spin the rates, that is. It's a game that pulled the media in... More

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Why is the $1,000 pill cheaper in the UK?

And other questions reporters should continue to ask about healthcare costs here and across the pond

A few days ago FiercePharma, which bills itself as the "pharma industry's daily monitor," posed this intriguing question: "Why does... More

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Sorry, Congressman: Obamacare hasn’t made more people uninsured

A factcheck from Washington makes its way into the Kansas media

A little press tale that blew out of the Kansas plains a couple weeks ago shows the value that media... More

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Oregon reporters missed the story of a failing health exchange—until they didn’t

After a slow start, the state press corps recovers with a bang

Behind Oregon's failed health insurance exchange is a story of spin that in some ways mirrors federal officials' management of... More

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The $1,000 pill is popular! So, who pays?

Pricey hepatitis C drug Sovaldi “shattered” sales expectations. Reporters need to keep asking the costs and benefits questions.

Remember the $1,000-per-pill hepatitis C treatment, Sovaldi, that wowed the press upon FDA approval in December? In the months since,... More

The Tea Party is timeless - Richard Hofstadter’s Anti-Intellectualism In American Life reviewed

How misinformation goes viral: a Truthy story - Conservative media’s reaction to an Indiana University project shows how shoddy information can quickly become an online narrative

Do you know Elise Andrew? - The creator of the Facebook page “I fucking love science” is journalism’s first self-made brand

Goodbye and good luck to all of us - Dean Starkman on leaving CJR

When quitting goes viral - Thanks to social media, resignations get a global audience


This Is How Joanna Coles Changed Cosmo (Refinery29)

The British reporter-turned-editor has made good on her promises to bring politics to the magazine, win some very big-deal journalism awards, and secure the most interesting exclusive interviews

Awareness, #Awareness, and Ray Rice (The Classical)

The coverage of Ray Rice’s punch is not translating into offering information on domestic violence

Bloggingheads

Greg Marx discusses democracy and news with Tom Rosenstiel of the American Press Institute

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