Friday, February 27, 2015. Last Update: Fri 2:51 PM EST

Behind the News

Unopen to Failure

Openness and transparency will help news sites survive

CAIRO—Isolation begets trouble. Myanmar and North Korea are isolated failures. Unvisited shut-ins die earlier than those with frequent human contact.... More

RTE’s Error of the Year

And other highlights from the year in corrections, retractions, and apologia

It’s been a very stressful couple of weeks. Every year at this time, I publish the Year in Media Errors... More

The Sweet Smell of Failure (Or Success) At a News Startup

Launch pad: Portland, Oregon

CJR’s “Launch Pad” feature invites new media publishers to blog about their experiences on the news frontier. Past columns by... More

You, Too, Can Own a Piece of The Onion

“America’s Finest News Source” is now franchising out its printing biz

After twenty-two years, The Onion has decided to both get out of the print business and double down on print... More

Journalists Need to Do the Math

Numbers still make many watchdogs whimper

CAIRO—I tell my students that in addition to English they should learn two more languages: an in-demand foreign tongue, and... More

Q&A: Blur Author Tom Rosenstiel

On verification and critical thinking in the new, open journalistic era

In their 2001 book, The Elements of Journalism Tom Rosenstiel and Bill Kovach list ten fundamental principles (“elements”) that make... More

Al Balk, 1969—1973

CJR’s second editor

Alfred Balk, the second editor of the Columbia Journalism Review, died in November at the age of eighty. Al, like... More

Close Encounters of the Media Kind

NASA press release leads to wild speculation about alien discovery

Over the last two days, bloggers at a few of the country’s top news outlets have engaged in wild and... More

Startup Rocket Science

Technical specs for a modern journalism business

CJR’s “Launch Pad” feature invites new media publishers to blog about their experiences on the news frontier. Past columns by... More

Opening Shot

In an election season, the press must sort fact from fiction and follow the money

The midterm election season produced stories that tested journalism’s ability to do what it must during political campaigns: sort fact... More

The Power of the Drones

Inside Slate’s efforts to crowdsource good ideas

People have to be damn committed to an idea to attend an event about it on a Monday night, even... More

How to Tackle the Sales Demon

Launch Pad: Portland, Oregon

CJR’s “Launch Pad” feature invites new media publishers to blog about their experiences on the news frontier. Past columns by... More

Has Tunisia Mesmerized Journalists?

Tunisia is one of the world’s worst places for journalists—but you wouldn’t know it

Tunis, Tunisia—The first time I heard the word “Tunisia” was as a child watching The Cosby Show. In one episode,... More

The Authenticity Contest

Knight News Challenge solicits authenticity-related projects

Accuracy is hot stuff these days, let me tell you. On Wednesday, Thomas Friedman of The New York Times dedicated... More

Haiti Coverage and “Disaster Porn”

Cholera epidemic offers convenient B-roll for nightly newscasts

Last month I was reporting a story on the opening of a mango warehouse in Haiti’s countryside when a fellow... More

New survey reveals everything you think about freelancing is true - Data from Project Word quantifies challenges of freelance investigative reporting

Why one editor won’t run any more op-eds by the Heritage Foundation’s top economist - A reply to Paul Krugman on state taxes and job growth made some incorrect claims

Why we ‘stave off’ colds - It all started with wine

The New Republic, then and now - Tallying the staff turnover at the overhauled magazine

Why serious journalism can coexist with audience-pleasing content - Legacy media organizations should experiment with digital platforms while continuing to publish hard news


The rise of feelings journalism (TNR)

“Bloom engaged in an increasingly popular style of writing, which I’ve discussed on my blog before, which I call “feelings journalism.” It involves a writer making an argument based on what they imagine someone else is thinking, what they feel may be another person’s feelings. The realm of fact, of reporting, has been left behind.”

Things a war correspondent should never say (WSJ)

“The correspondent retelling war stories surely knows that fellow correspondents had faced the same dangers or worse”

On WaPo trying to interview a cow (National Journal)

“‘I wasn’t milked on the White House lawn by a strange man,’ The Washington Post—the venerable institution that would later come to break the Watergate scandal and win 48 Pulitzers—quoted her, a farm animal, as saying”

Bloggingheads

Greg Marx discusses democracy and news with Tom Rosenstiel of the American Press Institute

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Who Owns What

The Business of Digital Journalism

A report from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Study Guides

Questions and exercises for journalism students.