Wednesday, October 22, 2014. Last Update: Wed 3:17 PM EST

Behind the News

Up and Down on the Bayou

A snapshot of The Times-Picayune five years after Katrina

In the spring of 2006, about seven months after Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans and a swath of the Gulf... More

Legal Aid

Yale’s Jack Balkin and Nabiha Syed discuss a new effort to protect press freedoms

The need for press freedom and government transparency is as urgent today as ever, but the newsrooms that long defended... More

Video: The Journalism of Opinion

Video from Columbia’s recent conference on opinion journalism in American intellectual history

On April 30, 2010, Columbia University hosted a conference on opinion journalism in American intellectual history. The conference was organized... More

The Secret to Rolling Stone’s Success

NYT explores how magazine prospers off the news cycle

That David Carr column flagged by Ryan Chittum this morning wasn’t the only item about Rolling Stone in today’s New... More

Press Freedoms Lag in Singapore

Modernity means more than progressive banking and shining cities

SINGAPORE—Walk the streets of Singapore and you may think you’re in the world’s most modern country. But Singaporeans you’re pacing... More

A Conversation with Andrew Alexander

The Washington Post ombudsman on the paper’s corrections process

Sooner or later, any news ombudsman or public editor will end up addressing the issues of accuracy, errors, and corrections.... More

The Day’s Big Story, Hours before It Was Published

Why Rolling Stone’s bombshell couldn’t be found, even as it was making news

Eric Bates had an unusual start to his day Tuesday. Bates is the executive editor of Rolling Stone, and his... More

And That’s Not the Way It Is

W. Joseph Campbell busts some persistent media myths

Journalism is a profession built on storytelling, so it’s no surprise that its history is filled with some remarkable tales.... More

The Man Who Imagined Tablets and E-Readers

An interview with Roger Fidler of the RJI Digital Publishing Alliance

In 1981, Roger Fidler wrote a visionary essay on the emergence of mobile reading devices like the Apple iPad and... More

Report the Error

Scott Rosenberg’s quest for a universal corrections button

Many of the corrections that appear in the press are notable thanks to the significance or amusing nature of the... More

Too Many Cooks

Celebrity chefs enjoy their media moment

There they are again, this time on the front of the Washington Post Style section. It’s the celebrity chefs, and... More

Unfriendly Fire

Wired’s scoop sets WikiLeaks a-Twitter

When, late Sunday night, Wired reported that Bradley Manning, a young Army intelligence staffer, had been arrested and charged with... More

The Myth of Tiananmen

And the price of a passive press

Mathews is an education reporter for The Washington Post. He was the paper's first Beijing bureau chief and returned in... More

Toxic Twins

When words are similar in spelling but very different in meaning

Utter the phrase “toxic twins” and most people immediately think of Steven Tyler and Joe Perry of Aerosmith. (Just ask... More

Stop trolling your readers - We know you’re only doing it for clicks

Des Moines Register prepares for a ‘very stressful’ newsroom restructuring - Editor Amalie Nash speaks on turnover, transformation, and a virtual reality adventure

PBS pulls ads from Harper’s Magazine after critical essay - Piece argues public broadcaster has fallen under the sway of political influence and outside money

Should all journalists be on Twitter? - Reasons to take up or forgo the 140-character platform

The Tennessean is borrowing reporters from other Gannett papers - Music columnist Peter Cooper is latest journalist to part ways with Nashville paper


Ben Bradlee, 93 (WaPo)

“From the moment he took over The Post newsroom in 1965, Mr. Bradlee sought to create an important newspaper that would go far beyond the traditional model of a metropolitan daily”

I’m a black journalist quitting media because I’m sick of racism (TNR)

“Among the challenges that make racism so difficult to fix, and so odiously constant, is that white people often don’t even recognize when they’re saying or doing something that cuts their black colleagues to the bone”

High Times hits middle age (NYMag)

After 40 years, every issue still features a weed centerfold

Lawmakers on why they’re mired in place (Esquire)

Mark Warren “spoke with 90 members of the House and Senate about what’s gone so wrong in Congress. Sometimes it got a little emotional.”

Bloggingheads

Greg Marx discusses democracy and news with Tom Rosenstiel of the American Press Institute

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Who Owns What

The Business of Digital Journalism

A report from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Study Guides

Questions and exercises for journalism students.