Those two elements—a corrections page and a correction being placed at the top of a post or article—are not new. What is new is the ability to take a correction or some form of update to an article, blog post, photo, or other piece of content, and present it in a multitude of ways. Welsh’s blog has a tumblelog and he easily included his corrections in this constantly updated list of links, Twitter messages, and songs he’s listened to. He also created a corrections RSS feed.

If you’re a news organization running a Django-based website, Welsh has created a basic yet high flexible and customizable corrections system for you.

“The Spokesman-Review runs on Django and they have a site-wide stream that has the latest stories and photos on the homepage, so it would be pretty easy to imagine a correction or update being a new kind of content in that stream,” he says. (Just click on the “Latest everything” tab near the top of the homepage to see the stream.)

The problem? “Corrections aren’t viewed as being part of the stream,” Welsh says.

We’re going to have to change how journalists view corrections before news organizations will think of implementing something like django-correx. Before corrections become part of the stream (or river, if you prefer).

Along with changing minds, we need to develop similar plug-ins for WordPress and other major blogging platforms and content management systems so that correction streams, feeds and email newsletter will become standard on news websites.

Welsh has done the initial work for Django. Who wants to carry the dream from here?

Correction of the Week

“The Game Meats Company at Myrtelford is a halal-accredited organisation which processes only goats, emus, ostriches and deer…At no stage did export operations manager Rick Cavedon say Senator Fielding had ’saved our bacon’.” – Border Mail (Australia)

Craig Silverman is the editor of RegretTheError.com and the author of Regret The Error: How Media Mistakes Pollute the Press and Imperil Free Speech. He is also the editorial director of OpenFile.ca and a columnist for the Toronto Star.