Rosenberg is currently pondering the creation of something similar for “report an error” functionality. There are currently some large news Web sites that offer this—including the Toronto Star and Huffington Post (though theirs is hidden near the bottom of articles)—but it is by no means a standard. The New York Times, The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, and CNN, among many others, don’t include that option on their articles and pages. It’s such a simple, effective way to collect error reports, not to mention give readers a chance to participate and contribute.

But where it should be placed on the page? Do we need a universal icon? How about the interface that pops up after you click on that button? Should that be standardized? The fundamental idea is sound, but there are lots of details to work out. Rosenberg is thinking of the best way to move forward with the idea, and I’m hoping to help.

We’d also like you to share your advice and input. Consider this an invitation to chime in with your choice of the call-to-action language, the functionality, the placement, etc. Are you a designer who’d like to try and create an icon? A site editor who wants to join up and get the result on your site? Add your comments below and Rosenberg and I will join in and follow up.

Oh, and as for that Journal correction request? They fixed the article but never added a correction. So we also have much work to do in terms of standardizing corrections. But one campaign at a time.

Correction of the Week

“An article about edible flowers in Wednesday’s Taste section included some examples of flowers that are not edible. These flowers, mentioned in the story, should not be eaten: lily of the valley, iris, hyacinth and some species of jasmine (Jasminum sambac flowers are edible). Linden flower tea can cause heart damage with frequent consumption. The Sun regrets the error.” - Baltimore Sun

Craig Silverman is the editor of RegretTheError.com and the author of Regret The Error: How Media Mistakes Pollute the Press and Imperil Free Speech. He is also the editorial director of OpenFile.ca and a columnist for the Toronto Star.