A search of Horus Kai yielded a company named Adad Ltd. The Companies House online database contains a PDF of Adad’s Form 363, the annual return UK companies are required to file. That form lists not just director’s names but also dates of birth and occupation—Horus Kai’s information, including her signature, matched that of Gu Kailai’s.

While corporate records clinched these stories, they would not have gotten off the ground without human sources, who provided the names that made document searches possible. The Wall Street Journal’s vigilant reporting on Bo Xilai since last year put them ahead of the game. The paper’s reporters—Jeremy Page, Brian Spegele, and Steve Eder—found a Denver lawyer with whom Gu Kailai had worked when she was hired to represent Chinese companies involved in lawsuits in the US 15 years ago.

It was this lawyer who revealed that Gu used a different name then; he also provided colorful details on Gu, who, he said seemed like “the Jackie Kennedy of China.” On April 7, the Journal came out with an excellent profile of Gu based on public records and interviews that offered revealing and previously unpublished information.

But despite all these revelations, one thing’s for sure: what’s come to light since February is likely just the tip of the iceberg. In the coming weeks, as reporters dig deeper, there’s bound to be more.

Editor’s Note: The article above contains several links useful for international, in-depth journalism, and here are some more:

Corporate Registers Worldwide

The Investigative Dashboard’s Worldwide Company Data is probably the most comprehensive listing of websites and databases where information on companies in more than 150 jurisdictions can be found. The Dashboard is a project of the nonprofit Overseas Crime and Corruption Reporting Project, based in Sarajevo, the International Center for Journalists, in the US, and the Forum for African Investigative Reporters.

Open Corporates calls itself “The Open Database of the Corporate World.” It contains information scraped from online corporate registers in more than 50 jurisdictions, including offshore havens like Panama and Bermuda. The site allows searches by company name, country, director name, and other keywords. So far it has records of more than 400 million companies worldwide.

The UK Companies House has a useful links page. At the bottom of that page is a list of links to selected registers worldwide.

The Corporate Intelligence Project has links to corporate registries in 50 states of the US and 65 countries around the world. It also enables searches for US government watch lists and regulatory agencies.

Hong Kong

Integrated Companies Registry Information System (ICRIS): this for-pay database kept by the Hong Kong Internal Revenue Department allows searches by company or director name. Annual returns list board members, their addresses and passport or ID numbers. Searches can be done in English or Chinese.

Hong Kong Exchange posts interim and annual reports of listed companies as well as required disclosures (e.g. acquisition of more than 15 percent of shares of a company, change of senior executives).

Hong Kong Land Registry’s searches can be done online for a fee; registry documents list present and past owners, transaction details (sale of property and price); mortgage details (bank name, amount).

China

State Administration for Industry and Commerce lists registered companies (Chinese website only). The registry is incomplete, but contains links to other branches of SAIC around the country.

Stock exchanges in Shanghai and Shenzhen provide information on listed companies, annual reports, and other filings available on the Chinese-language version of the exchanges’ sites.

Websites of local courts and lawyers’ associations

Beijing court system

Beijing Lawyers’ Association

Dalian court system

Dalian Lawyers’ Association

Zhengzhou court system

Zhengzhou Lawyers’ Association

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Sheila S. Coronel is director of the Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism at Columbia’s Graduate School of Journalism. She writes about global investigative reporting at http://watchdog-watcher.com.