Saturday, August 02, 2014. Last Update: Fri 4:08 PM EST

Culture

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Your head will spin: Uses of ‘naught,’ ‘aught,’ and ‘ought’

Time to start writing some tongue-twisters

If someone says "I know aught about football," the amount of knowledge could be a lot or nothing. That's because... More

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Not-so-secret lives on smartphones

There may be no better way to report on the internal lives of others than to examine what’s on their phones

Call it journalistic phone hacking with consent. On The Secret Life of Students, a recent documentary series on the UK’s... More

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Gotcha!

Get, got, and gotten

A software program that acts as a super spelling checker often stops on the word "got," and asks, in effect,... More

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How Katrina and BP spill coverage defined NOLA as the two events, in turn, shaped local press

A review of Oil and Water: Media Lessons from Hurricane Katrina and The Deepwater Horizon Disaster

When Hurricane Katrina charged through New Orleans, the devastation left in its wake had an unintended side effect: It became... More

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Wanton behavior

The difference between “want” and “wont”

In the 1700s, Garner's Modern American Usage says, Samuel Johnson declared an end to "wont." But, Garner's continues, "it hangs... More

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LeBron’s SI announcement was the anti-‘Decision’

It looks like he didn’t want to once again incur fan wrath with his latest movement announcement

Last Friday the sports world was astonished by two stories. First, the NBA's best player, LeBron James, was reversing his... More

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How reporters used data covering the World Cup

Some pieces were revealing; others threw out numbers without saying anything

With the 2014 World Cup set to end on Sunday, this week's edition of Data Darts and Laurels will focus... More

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Measuring up

Uses of “gauge”

The word “gauge” plays several roles. It both measures something and is the measure of something. A speedometer, for example,... More

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Government lies

Charles Lewis’ new book says nonprofit journalism is the answer to government lying and corporate bullying—but we have to figure out how to pay for it

On August 5, 1964, President Lyndon Johnson went on national television and told the following story: Three days earlier, North... More

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Striking redundant expressions

Why use two words when one would do?

"Write tighter" is a plea most journalists have heard, probably more than once. One way to do so is to... More

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A parting shot

Michael Hastings’ posthumous novel skewers the media elite

The Last Magazine By Michael Hastings Blue Rider Press 352 pages Hardcover, $26.95 Michael Hastings first burst onto the national... More

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Received wisdom

How think tanks became the malls of America’s intellectual life

Think Tanks in America By Thomas Medvetz University of Chicago Press 344 pages Hardcover, $32.50 The Public Broadcasting Service's round-the-clock... More

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Brief encounters

Short reviews of Saving Community Journalism: The Path to Profitability and Foreign Correspondent: A Memoir

Saving Community Journalism: The Path to Profitability By Penelope Muse Abernathy The University of North Carolina Press 254 pages; $27.50... More

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Old rivalries, old words

The reappearance of “caliphate” and “the Levant”

From a language point of view, what's happening in Iraq, Syria, and environs has revived words that have not been... More

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How to tell if you’re using ‘irony’ or ‘sarcasm’

It’s a fine line

A father and daughter were deep in discussion over breakfast at a diner. "That's not irony, that's sarcasm," the father... More

How Forbes got to $475 million - That’s what a Hong Kong investor has agreed to pay for a firm that two years ago had trouble paying its rent

Journalists subpoenaed in ‘pink-slime’ suit - BPI wants emails from NYT’s Michael Moss, public-health lawyer Michele Simon, and others

Bloomberg struggles to break out of the box - Justin Smith’s ambitious digital transformation hits some bumps

The Grand Dame of Florida reporting has retired twice, but she’s still causing trouble - A conversation with the Tampa Bay Times’ Lucy Morgan

Embedded with the Koch brothers - Hometown reporters get rare access to the media-shy oilmen, with mixed results


James Fallows on David Frum’s asserted, then retracted, charge the NYT ran fake photos of Gaza

“For all their blind spots and flaws, reporters on the scene are trying to see, so they can tell, and the photographic and video reporters take greater risks than all the rest, since they must be closer to the action. For people on the other side of the world to casually assert that they’re just making things up—this could and would drive them crazy.”

The 60-second interview: Marty Baron (Capital New York)

CAPITAL: I just noticed that the most-read story right now on your website is an aggregated piece about a Russian lizard sex station in space. BARON: [Laughs] Is that right?

Your iPhone can now make free encrypted calls (Wired)

The beginning of the end of burner phones?

The new face of Richard Norris (GQ)

“‘Richard?’ I say. ‘Richard?’ I shove his shoulder and nothing happens. He is dead. He is on my watch and he is dead. I hear gurgling. Breathing. He’s on my watch and he is not dead.”

Bloggingheads

Greg Marx discusses democracy and news with Tom Rosenstiel of the American Press Institute

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Who Owns What

The Business of Digital Journalism

A report from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Study Guides

Questions and exercises for journalism students.