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Darts and Laurels

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Darts & Laurels

2012’s media highlights and lowlights

DART for callowness: Vice magazine After crowing about its access to on-the-lam software pioneer John McAfee (“We are with John McAfee... More

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Darts & Laurels

2012’s media highlights and lowlights

DART for grade inflation: Charles Jaco, KTVI, St. Louis, MO When you’re interviewing a senatorial candidate who says, as Todd Akin... More

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Darts & Laurels

2012’s media highlights and lowlights

DART for inflaming an already tense situation: Business Insider, The Daily Caller, Michelle Malkin, NBC News Following Trayvon Martin’s death... More

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Meet the Debt Fixers

A laurel to New York magazine

For weeks on end the dominant financial story has been: (A) the consequences of falling off the fiscal cliff;... More

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A laurel to the Hartford Courant

Local coverage at its best

Connecticut is the third smallest state in the country, area-wise, with a total population less than half that of New... More

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A magazine editor shops for health insurance

And offers lessons for reporting on the stuff

Frank Lalli, the long-time editor of Money, undoubtedly edited a health insurance piece or two during his career. But... More

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Dart: CBS and the Goldman Sachs solution

Another weak showing on Social Security

Maybe CBS Evening News anchor Scott Pelley was so awestruck by a chance to visit one of the seven... More

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A dart to Yahoo Finance

For utterly confusing its readers about Social Security

By now we’re accustomed to weak reporting about Social Security, but a piece on Yahoo Finance, part of its... More

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Darts and Laurels

Women’s work

When The New York Times made Buffalo News editor Margaret Sullivan its new public editor in September, there seemed... More

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The Ad Wars: a laurel to the Sunlight Foundation

Report brings scrutiny to new political ad database

In an important victory for transparency advocates, the Federal Communications Commission recently began requiring broadcasters to post the files... More

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Darts and Laurels

That’s sick

The Daily Caller drew some odd conclusions from a June survey of physicians, when it published a report with... More

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Medicare costs: Are electronic records the solution—or the problem?

A Laurel to the Center for Public Integrity for an expose on “upcoding”

Electronic billing has been promoted as a big cost savings for healthcare. But is it? The Center for Public... More

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How the phantom of ‘socialized medicine’ came to be

A Laurel to The New Yorker for exploring the roots of modern political consulting

Jill Lepore deserves a Laurel for her engrossing tale of how political communications came to be so toxic. In... More

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A laurel to The Denver Post

For strong editorial judgment in its coverage of the “47 percent” story

The secret video recording of Mitt Romney’s now-infamous “47 percent” comment went live on the Mother Jones website at... More

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A laurel to FlackCheck.org

For its new guide to video factchecking on air and online

The recent journalistic debate about factchecking has prompted some compelling discussion about different strategies, different methods, and what works... More

Stop using ‘Brooklyn’ to mean hipster neighborhoods - Elite-oriented outlets typically only cover the borough’s most affluent, Manhattan-adjacent neighborhoods

The Reporters Committee is about to start suing people to help journalists - Katie Townsend joins the organization as its first litigation director

How a Nebraska newspaper kicked off a major prison sentencing scandal - The Omaha World-Herald found that hundreds of inmates were being released early

On media freedom, United Nations plays by its own rules - Months of international crises raises the stakes for reporting on the UN, but investigative journalists remain without a right to information

Keep calm and write a headline worth reading - Ease up on the exaggerations because someday you may need those explosive adjectives when a truly big story lands


Female sportscasters are speaking up (NYT)

“[i]n the wake of the recent scandals, women have been driving the story, providing a perspective that their male counterparts simply cannot”

Adviser of high school paper that refused to use ‘Redskins’ suspended (Student Press Law Center)

“Amid a months-long battle with administrators for editorial control … the Playwickian’s faculty adviser was suspended for two days this week”

Apple’s ‘warrant canary’ disappears (GigaOm)

Apple included language in its first Transparency Report to say that it had not been subject to a Section 215 Patriot Act request. That language is now gone.

Trend Piece (New Yorker)

Buzzword, buzzword, buzzword. Isn’t the buzzword on your mind now? Perhaps it is on other people’s minds? Read on or you’ll be clueless, dated, and without any friends in the world. Buzzword again!

Bloggingheads

Greg Marx discusses democracy and news with Tom Rosenstiel of the American Press Institute

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