Saturday, April 19, 2014. Last Update: Fri 2:50 PM EST

Feature

One of Us

A soldier chooses journalism, but his old boss won’t let go

On what I thought was my last day in the Army in May 2007, my battalion commander gave me some... More

Groundhog Day

Why this year’s health-care debate sounds like the one in 1993

Last fall, soon after Barack Obama was elected president, Sheila Burke was waiting to discuss Obama’s campaign promises, via Webcast,... More

Identity Crisis

The Wall Street Journal steers away from what made it great

In December 2008, a year after* Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp. purchased The Wall Street Journal, the paper had a holiday... More

Waiting for CNBC

A tragicomedy in one long act

“But eight point one percent. . . . Uh, that’s what you said, right, Zandi?” “I said eight. I said eight. Eight point one... More

A Matter of Trust

One story from Gaza and what it says about the coverage of Israel

On Thursday morning, March 19, Israelis woke to find a story on the front pages of two leading daily newspapers... More

A Vision in the Desert

The National tries to lift journalism in Abu Dhabi

It’s 11 a.m. in mid-June and ten section editors have crowded around the table at the center of The National’s... More

The Smell of Paradise

Under pressure in Gaza: a reporter’s notebook

First Day It is 10:40 on a sunny and warm Saturday morning, and time for my walk through Gaza. I... More

Covering Gaza from Israel

What Israelis wanted to know about the war

During the first week of Israel’s winter military operation in Gaza, a broadcaster for ChanNel 2, which has the highest... More

Crash Course

How to cover a car wreck

The fatal car crash is, unfortunately, an all-too-familiar staple of local journalism. Each of us can summon a grim collage... More

Heresy on the Right

A handful of new Web sites try to rewire conservative media

Electoral defeat tends to spawn bouts of ideological tinkering—when the Democrats lost the presidential election in 2004, a clutch of... More

The List

What the business press did (and didn’t do) while the financial crisis was brewing

Welcome to the List, a comprehensive catalog of relevant stories produced by major business-news outlets on the lending industry and... More

A Social-Network Solution

How investigative reporting got back on its feet

Washington, D.C., 2014—It didn’t seem possible. Who would have thought, amid the newsroom devastation of the first decade of the... More

Old Hands, New Voice

How NGOs learned to do news

NEW YORK, 2014—Back in 2009, the future of international reporting looked bleak indeed. Several big U.S. newspapers had shut down... More

Unchaining the Monitor

How an early Web-first strategy worked out

BOSTON, 2014—In October 2008, The Christian Science Monitor announced it was shifting to a “Web-first, multiplatform strategy.” The bulk of... More

So Cool

How an economic weather map changed the climate

Washington , D.C., 2014—The economic weather map, which started out as a gimmick, changed everything. It showed us how the... More

16 women whose digital startups deserve Vox-level plaudits - A look at the media entrepreneurs who aren’t grabbing headlines

Why was ‘Dasani’ shut out of the Pulitzers? - 5 problems with The New York Times’ ambitious, influential series on the life of one homeless Brooklyn girl

The AP downplays its Obamacare scoop - Repeal on deductible caps marks another step in The Great Cost Shift

The enduring pull of mag covers - Why do magazine cover images still hold so much cultural power in this decline-of-print era?

Michael Wolff’s digital media bloopers - The Newser founder trolls (other) digital-news companies


The shirt on your back

How did the clothes you’re wearing get to you? We trace the human cost of the Bangladeshi garment industry in video, words and pictures

Anxious royalist

Fantastic letter in The Times

Coming out as a porn star

How do you tell your family and friends?

The truth about Google X

A look behind the secretive lab’s closed doors

New Jersey’s good government

Despite the bridge scandal, Chris Christie’s state is relatively transparent and accountable. CJR’s Greg Marx talks to Gordon Witkin

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Who Owns What

The Business of Digital Journalism

A report from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Study Guides

Questions and exercises for journalism students.