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The Magazine

January/February 2009

Articles

Essay

Condition Critical

Can arts critics survive the poison pill of consumerism?

I saw the future through a two-way mirror in November 1990. I had just started a new job as a... More

Feature

Opening India

The world’s largest democracy finally has an FOI law—so why have journalists been slow to embrace it?

In October, community activists from around India gathered at the Nehru Memorial Museum & Library in New Delhi to celebrate... More

On the Job

The Wikinews Ace

Why Shimon Peres sat down with David Shankbone

One morning in December 2007, a law-school dropout named David Shankbone sat on a couch in Shimon Peres’s office in... More

Essay

Dig In

In an era of global shortages and biofuel debates, the food beat gets serious

This past fall, I drove from St. Louis to Osage County, in central Missouri, to meet a hog farmer named... More

Feature

What We Learned In the Meltdown

Financial journalists saw some trees but not the forest. Now what?

One day in June 2005, my colleague Nell Henderson and I hiked over to the Bond Market Association to get... More

Essay

Un-American

Have you listened to the right-wing media lately?

In the weeks following the election, the debate over the issue of media bias, and of whether the press was... More

Transparency

Hung Out to Dry

The national-security press dug up the dirt, but Congress wilted

In November and December 2005, The Washington Post and The New York Times published two groundbreaking national-security stories that revealed... More

Feature

A See-Through Society

How the Web is opening up our democracy

It may be a while before the people who run the U.S. House of Representatives’ Web service forget the week... More

Feature

What We Didn’t Know Has Hurt Us

The Bush administration was pathological about secrecy. Here’s what needs to be undone after eight dark years—and why it won’t be easy.

Advocates for open and transparent government are quick to note that no American presidential administration has, in practice, been enthusiastic... More

Departments

Short Takes

Glory Days

The old TV series Lou Grant offers a salve of newspaper nostalgia

These are brutal times for the newspaper industry. Widespread buyouts, shuttered bureaus, diminished ambitions—in many cases, not even the physical... More

Darts and Laurels

Dart to The Plain Dealer

Send tips and comments to dartsandlaurels@cjr.org

Dart to the Cleveland Plain Dealer for failing to stick by its story. Last October, investigative reporter Bob Paynter, at... More

Short Takes

Entitled Time

Campaign reporters catch up on their reading

After two harried years on the trail, an endless stream of hotel rooms, fast food bolted on the fly, the... More

Short Takes

Cloudy Skies

A new online environment and energy energy site is tainted with conflicts of interest among its anchors and executives

In many ways, CleanSkies.tv, an online outfit offering “energy and environmental news, information, discussion, and commentary,” resembles other TV news... More

Editorial

Let There Be Light

How President Obama should reopen our government

Over many years, Americans have come to embrace the idea that democracy suffers when the work of government is excessively... More

Ideas & Reviews

Review

The Devil Made Them Do It

A new anthology about men (and women) behaving very badly

True Crime: An American Anthology Harold Schechter, editor The Library of America 788 pages, $40 The teenage girl gave birth... More

The Research Report

Feet to the Fire

Does journalism keep government honest?

For a profession that lives by the cynical adage, “If your mother says she loves you, check it out,” journalism... More

Review

Here Comes the Bogeyman

A chaotic portrait of Rupert Murdoch and his discontents

The Man Who Owns the News: Inside the Secret World of Rupert Murdoch By Michael Wolff Broadway 446 pages,... More

Review

Brief Encounters

Short reviews of books about art on the New York Times’s Op-Ed page, the short life of The Chicagoan, and hoaxes in the news.

All the Art That’s Fit to Print (And Some That Wasn’t): Inside The New York Times Op-Ed Page By Jerelle... More

The Tea Party is timeless - Richard Hofstadter’s Anti-Intellectualism In American Life reviewed

How misinformation goes viral: a Truthy story - Conservative media’s reaction to an Indiana University project shows how shoddy information can quickly become an online narrative

Do you know Elise Andrew? - The creator of the Facebook page “I fucking love science” is journalism’s first self-made brand

Goodbye and good luck to all of us - Dean Starkman on leaving CJR

When quitting goes viral - Thanks to social media, resignations get a global audience


This Is How Joanna Coles Changed Cosmo (Refinery29)

The British reporter-turned-editor has made good on her promises to bring politics to the magazine, win some very big-deal journalism awards, and secure the most interesting exclusive interviews

Awareness, #Awareness, and Ray Rice (The Classical)

The coverage of Ray Rice’s punch is not translating into offering information on domestic violence

Bloggingheads

Greg Marx discusses democracy and news with Tom Rosenstiel of the American Press Institute

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Who Owns What

The Business of Digital Journalism

A report from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Study Guides

Questions and exercises for journalism students.