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The Magazine

July/August 2009

Articles

Feature

Expensive Gifts

What does free culture cost?

One evening in February 2009, the artist Shepard Fairey spoke at the New York Public Library. He was discussing his... More

Feature

What’s a Fair Share In the Age of Google?

How to think about news in the link economy

The buzz inside Google is overwhelmingly positive about what the company does and how we will all benefit from the... More

Feature

Open for Business

If you want readers to buy news, what exactly will you sell? The case for a free/paid hybrid.

In the dark winter and spring of 2009, as dispatches from the news business grew ever more grim, as Jim... More

Feature

Build the Wall

Most readers won’t pay for news, but if we move quickly, maybe enough of them will. One man’s bold blueprint.

To all of the bystanders reading this, pardon us. The true audience for this essay narrows necessarily to a pair... More

Feature

Leap of Faith

Inside the movement to build an audience of citizens

What inspired you to become a journalist? I always liked writing, and I was also into photography. And I knew... More

Feature

A Man in Full

Four years after Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans broadcaster Garland Robinette is still fighting mad

It was the birds that tipped him off. Two days before Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans, while the storm was... More

Feature

One of Us

A soldier chooses journalism, but his old boss won’t let go

On what I thought was my last day in the Army in May 2007, my battalion commander gave me some... More

Feature

Groundhog Day

Why this year’s health-care debate sounds like the one in 1993

Last fall, soon after Barack Obama was elected president, Sheila Burke was waiting to discuss Obama’s campaign promises, via Webcast,... More

Cover Story

No Free Lunch

Who will pay for news? CJR presents four stories searching for journalism’s economic model

Journalists tend to move in packs. Not long ago we thought that the key to the business model of the... More

Departments

Editorial

The Grave Dancer’s Folly

Blaming newspapers for their plight is a waste of precious time

Despite the tedious posturing of both Web triumphalists (Jeff Jarvis to the Newspaper Association of America: “You blew it!”) and... More

Short Takes

Global Village

Are regional columnists under pressure to think locally?

Let’s not call this a trend. Not yet, please. In April, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, the paper that championed civil rights... More

Short Takes

A Kind of Victory

Remembering El Salvador’s struggle and those who covered it

“El Salvador is now the most dangerous country in the world for foreign journalists,” NBC's John Chancellor told viewers on... More

Short Takes

Into the Fold

How the online sports community has become part of the mainstream

Regular watchers of ESPN —that is, all sports fans—may have noticed the network has begun allotting more airtime to the... More

Darts and Laurels

Darts and Laurels

Send tips and suggestions to dartsandlaurels@cjr.org

Laurel to The Arizona Republic for “Perfectly Legal,” a series of six articles, published in May, that exposed a network... More

Ideas & Reviews

Second Read

‘The Greatest Liar’

Is Defoe’s A Journal of the Plague Year a work of journalism?

I first read Daniel Defoe’s A Journal of the Plague Year on a train from Boston to New York. That’s... More

Essay

Why John Lennon Matters

The case for professional pop-music critics in an amateur age

A John Lennon song floated over our rental-car radio as my father and I wound our way past silos and... More

Review

Brief Encounters

Short reviews of books on campaign bloggers, tabloids, and a collection of Henry Fairlie’s essays

Bloggers on the Bus: How the Internet Changed Politics and the Press By Eric Boehlert Free Press 280 pages, $26... More

Review

Heart of Stone

A distinguished new biography of a career contrarian

American Radical: The Life and Times of I. F. Stone | By D. D. Guttenplan | Farrar, Straus, and Giroux | 224... More

The Research Report

Edifice Rex

How newspapers lost their spots in the skyline

It was billed “The Fight of the Century” before a single punch was thrown: Jack Johnson versus Jim Jeffries, black... More

Stop trolling your readers - We know you’re only doing it for clicks

Des Moines Register prepares for a ‘very stressful’ newsroom restructuring - Editor Amalie Nash speaks on turnover, transformation, and a virtual reality adventure

PBS pulls ads from Harper’s Magazine after critical essay - Piece argues public broadcaster has fallen under the sway of political influence and outside money

Should all journalists be on Twitter? - Reasons to take up or forgo the 140-character platform

The Tennessean is borrowing reporters from other Gannett papers - Music columnist Peter Cooper is latest journalist to part ways with Nashville paper


How one reporter copes inside the ‘Ebola bubble’ (BuzzFeed)

“Bring gloves to give nurses you meet at clinics, even if you’re there for a story. Get small change to give to the kids who have been out of school for months and are selling ground nuts for pitiful sums on the side of road. Hell, give them candy. Violate all the principles of ostensibly good aid stewardship, because the good stewardship of the developed world didn’t get help here in time, and now everyone is dying around you.”

Fake news sites using Facebook to spread Ebola panic (The Verge)

“These sites claim to be satirical but lack even incompetent attempts at anything resembling humor”

How Ben Bradlee dealt with flacks (Washington Post)

“I would like to be sure that you understand that we trust our editors’ news judgement and that we distrust yours”

Ben Bradlee, 93 (WaPo)

“From the moment he took over The Post newsroom in 1965, Mr. Bradlee sought to create an important newspaper that would go far beyond the traditional model of a metropolitan daily”

Bloggingheads

Greg Marx discusses democracy and news with Tom Rosenstiel of the American Press Institute

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Who Owns What

The Business of Digital Journalism

A report from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Study Guides

Questions and exercises for journalism students.