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The Magazine

March/April 2009



A Social-Network Solution

How investigative reporting got back on its feet

Washington, D.C., 2014—It didn’t seem possible. Who would have thought, amid the newsroom devastation of the first decade of the... More


Old Hands, New Voice

How NGOs learned to do news

NEW YORK, 2014—Back in 2009, the future of international reporting looked bleak indeed. Several big U.S. newspapers had shut down... More


Unchaining the Monitor

How an early Web-first strategy worked out

BOSTON, 2014—In October 2008, The Christian Science Monitor announced it was shifting to a “Web-first, multiplatform strategy.” The bulk of... More


So Cool

How an economic weather map changed the climate

Washington , D.C., 2014—The economic weather map, which started out as a gimmick, changed everything. It showed us how the... More


The New Niche

How tax incentives and technology came to the rescue

Washington, D.C., 2014—By 2009, we were at an impasse. The news business—newspapers in particular—was collapsing, and there was no obvious... More


In the Foothills of Change

Foreign coverage seems doomed, but it’s only just begun

Some months ago, while exploring files in the nearly empty, ink-blackened basement of the old New York Times building on... More


No Profit, No Problem

How a new city daily (on newsprint!) rolled

San Francisco, 2014—With the collapse of the business model undergirding the tradition of muckraking journalism—and the double-digit profit margins it... More


Rise of the Reader

How books got wings

New York, 2014—Back in 2009, the headlines about book sales and the future of the publishing industry looked about as... More


Two Tents

How Politico might work out. Or not.

ARLINGTON, VA, 2014—The quirky assignment handed down by CJR’s editors—to imagine the future as though observing the past—brings to mind... More


Get Off the Bus

The future of pro-am journalism

Standing before a fawning crowd at a private fundraiser in San Francisco last April, Senator Barack Obama’s usually finely calibrated... More


Suffering in Silence

Ground Zero’s other victims

Even now, more than seven years later, images of that day remain frightfully raw, in large measure because a legion... More


The Sarcastic Times

For Rachel Maddow and the other ironic anchors, absurdity is serious stuff

On a Wednesday night in December, Rachel Maddow, in a toreador-style black jacket, waits for her show to start. She... More


Good Morning, Postville!

An unlikely thorn in Agriprocessors’ side

As a new work week began in Postville, Iowa, last November, Jeff Abbas, with his bushy gray beard and ample... More

Cover Story

Roll the Dice

How one journalist gambled on the future of news

Nine months. We’d been at this project for nine months, beginning with a few sketches on a whiteboard about how... More


Language Corner

Snark Hunt

The search for the true meaning

Sometimes, dictionaries just don’t get it. this one will define a word one way; that one will define the same... More


Reasons to Believe

Journalism’s search for a support system

There is a lot of death talk around journalism lately. A case in point that stuck in our craw was... More

Short Takes

Craigslist = Straw Man

Tracking advertising revenue in the digital age

Data gathered by the Newspaper Association of America show a savage decline in newspaper ad revenue in the third... More

Short Takes

One Shot

A Q & A with Iranian photographer Jamshid Bayrami

In 1999, an Iranian college student and an Iranian news photographer crossed paths briefly but momentously in Tehran during... More

Short Takes

Dutch Treat

The Netherlands’s newspaper economic crisis

After a cry for help from the print media, the Dutch government has established an €8 million ($10.2 million) fund... More

Darts and Laurels

Darts and Laurels 

Send tips and suggestions to

Laurel to the Chattanooga Times Free Press, The Tennessean, and The Post and Courier for strong reporting on the coal-ash... More

Ideas & Reviews


Buyer Beware

A history of redlining and racism in Chicago

Family Properties: Race, Real Estate, and the Exploitation of Black America | By Beryl Satter | Metropolitan Books | 512... More


Picture Perfect?

In three new graphic histories, the facts get a visual boost

08: A Graphic Diary of the Campaign Trail | By Michael Crowley And Dan Goldman | Three Rivers Press |... More


Brief Encounters

Short reviews of books about Fred Friendly and America’s early newspapermen

Friendlyvision: Fred Friendly and the Rise and Fall of Television Journalism | By Ralph Engelman, Foreword by Morley Safer |... More

The Research Report

Luces in the Sky

Covering big pharma in the age of marketing

When Time magazine went culinary trend-spotting in July 1951, it bypassed usual suspects like new ice-cream flavors and found a... More

New survey reveals everything you think about freelancing is true - Data from Project Word quantifies challenges of freelance investigative reporting

Why one editor won’t run any more op-eds by the Heritage Foundation’s top economist - A reply to Paul Krugman on state taxes and job growth made some incorrect claims

Why we ‘stave off’ colds - It all started with wine

The New Republic, then and now - Tallying the staff turnover at the overhauled magazine

Why serious journalism can coexist with audience-pleasing content - Legacy media organizations should experiment with digital platforms while continuing to publish hard news

The rise of feelings journalism (TNR)

“Bloom engaged in an increasingly popular style of writing, which I’ve discussed on my blog before, which I call “feelings journalism.” It involves a writer making an argument based on what they imagine someone else is thinking, what they feel may be another person’s feelings. The realm of fact, of reporting, has been left behind.”

Things a war correspondent should never say (WSJ)

“The correspondent retelling war stories surely knows that fellow correspondents had faced the same dangers or worse”

On WaPo trying to interview a cow (National Journal)

“‘I wasn’t milked on the White House lawn by a strange man,’ The Washington Post—the venerable institution that would later come to break the Watergate scandal and win 48 Pulitzers—quoted her, a farm animal, as saying”


Greg Marx discusses democracy and news with Tom Rosenstiel of the American Press Institute

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Who Owns What

The Business of Digital Journalism

A report from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Study Guides

Questions and exercises for journalism students.