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The Magazine

March/April 2010

Articles

Feature

Repression Goes Digital

The Internet has become a chokepoint in the struggle for a free press

In what has been dubbed "The Twitter Revolution," citizens in Tehran since June have been documenting violence in the street... More

Feature

An Rx for Reporting

Yesterday’s strategies failed on the health-reform story. Now what?

Just before Christmas, a CNN poll asked Americans whether they favored or opposed the health-reform bills moving through Congress. Forty-two... More

Feature

The Education of Herb And Marion Sandler

When two patrons of aggressive journalism became its targets, they cried foul. They have a point.

As of July 16, 2010, the end of this story has been updated with new information about Paul Bishop's wrongful... More

Feature

An Icon Fades

Ebony shaped the black middle class, then misread its digital moment

Ebony magazine, the African-American monthly, has been a beloved institution in black America for more than sixty years. These days... More

Cover Story

Dumb Like a Fox

Fox News isn’t part of the GOP; it has simply (and shamelessly) mastered the confines of cable

Last December 10 was a big news day. U.S. Senate negotiators announced they had agreed to a compromise on health... More

Feature

NPR Amps Up

Can Vivian Schiller build a journalism juggernaut?

If I were writing this story for All Things Considered, I might open with some audio: the sound of applause.... More

Feature

Tangled Web

A CJR survey finds that magazines are allowing their Web sites to erode journalistic standards

An article about a new CJR survey of practices at magazine Web sites that was published in the March/April issue... More

Feature

A Success Story

The Web is the star, but print is the unsung hero

In coastal Maine, community journalism has been running on parallel tracks in recent years. On one track, an aspiring publisher... More

Feature

An Rx for Reporting

Yesterday’s strategies failed on the health-reform story. Now what?

Just before Christmas, a CNN poll asked Americans whether they favored or opposed the health-reform bills moving through Congress. Forty-two... More

Departments

Darts and Laurels

Darts and Laurels

A paper in the Midwest exposes a scandal. Thirty years later, it does it again.

In 1979, Des Moines Register reporters Mike McGraw and Margaret Engel discovered sixty mentally disabled men eviscerating turkeys at an... More

Editorial

The Unconquered

A grassroots effort to keep journalism’s mission alive

In late October 2005, Dan Grech returned home to Miami after two months spent covering the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina... More

Short Takes

Too Much Information?

The release of battle footage sparks a controversy in Norway

It is New Year’s Eve in northern Afghanistan. A small group of Norwegian soldiers is en route to meet... More

Short Takes

Press Crimes?

Scrutinizing whether media outlets spurred on the war in the Balkans

On November 20, 1991, Serbia’s newspapers and TV stations picked up a startling report: forty-one Serbian children had been massacred... More

Ideas & Reviews

Review

The Price of Admission

Andrew Ross Sorkin’s debut and the limits of access journalism

Too Big to Fail: The Inside Story of How Wall Street and Washington Fought to Save the Financial System—and Themselves... More

The Research Report

True to Form

Online journalism, like print journalism, can be a variety of things

Even the ways we think about revolutionary forces shape our revolutions. Revolutions are products of multiple institutional and personal decisions,... More

Review

Critical Condition

Can a retailer-sponsored book review keep its critical hands clean?

Christopher Hayes is a European-style social democrat, who worked at the left-leaning In These Times before assuming his current job... More

Review

Brief Encounters

Short reviews of books about the future of journalism and a career at the Times

The Death and Life of American Journalism: The Media Revolution That Will Begin the World Again By Robert W. McChesney... More

Second Read

What Happened Here?

Joan Didion’s forty-year-old cautionary tale still fits America

It was my mother, of all people, who introduced me to Joan Didion’s Slouching Towards Bethlehem. This was in the... More

Stop trolling your readers - We know you’re only doing it for clicks

Des Moines Register prepares for a ‘very stressful’ newsroom restructuring - Editor Amalie Nash speaks on turnover, transformation, and a virtual reality adventure

PBS pulls ads from Harper’s Magazine after critical essay - Piece argues public broadcaster has fallen under the sway of political influence and outside money

Should all journalists be on Twitter? - Reasons to take up or forgo the 140-character platform

The Tennessean is borrowing reporters from other Gannett papers - Music columnist Peter Cooper is latest journalist to part ways with Nashville paper


How one reporter copes inside the ‘Ebola bubble’ (BuzzFeed)

“Bring gloves to give nurses you meet at clinics, even if you’re there for a story. Get small change to give to the kids who have been out of school for months and are selling ground nuts for pitiful sums on the side of road. Hell, give them candy. Violate all the principles of ostensibly good aid stewardship, because the good stewardship of the developed world didn’t get help here in time, and now everyone is dying around you.”

Fake news sites using Facebook to spread Ebola panic (The Verge)

“These sites claim to be satirical but lack even incompetent attempts at anything resembling humor”

How Ben Bradlee dealt with flacks (Washington Post)

“I would like to be sure that you understand that we trust our editors’ news judgement and that we distrust yours”

Ben Bradlee, 93 (WaPo)

“From the moment he took over The Post newsroom in 1965, Mr. Bradlee sought to create an important newspaper that would go far beyond the traditional model of a metropolitan daily”

Bloggingheads

Greg Marx discusses democracy and news with Tom Rosenstiel of the American Press Institute

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Who Owns What

The Business of Digital Journalism

A report from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Study Guides

Questions and exercises for journalism students.