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The Magazine

November/December 2006



The Continuing Story

How Iraq is different from, and the same as, other wars

Richard Engel NBC News I’ve been in Iraq for a while. I’ve been there longer than any of the... More


In the Beginning

The early days of the Iraq war gave journalists freedom to report, but also hints of something darker

Dexter Filkins The New York Times If you look at the whole arc of this thing, it used to be... More


Turning Points

Everyone has a story about when things began to go bad

Dexter Filkins The New York Times I remember the whole period from October, November, December 2003, everybody — all the... More


The Death of Supply Column 21

A lesson from the Vietnam War on the press, the military, and authority.

The Associated Press bureau that operated out of Saigon starting in mid-1965 was a great one — a place of... More


Omens and Incidents

Negotiating cultural fault lines in Iraq

Borzou Daragahi Los Angeles Times I know how religious the people in Iraq are, how traditional they are with... More


The Reign of the CPA

An effort to spin the war occasionally veered into the absurd

Patrick Cockburn The Independent (London) At a certain point, in 2003, I remember the exact moment the British had moved... More


Liberties and Ambiguities

As Iraq began to unravel

Chris Hondros Getty Images Once the fighting stopped, it seemed like the country was getting more pacified. By mid-April or... More


Reporting in Iraq

The mundane and the profound

Nir Rosen Freelance writer I met a young Iraqi guy [in April 2003], college student, secular Shia guy, very street-smart,... More


The Embeds

What is gained, and what is lost

Dan Murphy The Christian Science Monitor Embedding is a fancy word for letting journalists go see what the military... More


Enemies and Civilians

How big stories could hide in plain sight

Anthony Shadid The Washington Post It was before Saddam’s capture. I think it was November 2003. I remember I was... More


The Good News

The clamor for ‘positive’ stories didn’t fit the reality of Iraq

Anthony Shadid The Washington Post When I hear this term “good news” [that the press allegedly fails to report], I... More


Darts and Laurels

Darts & Laurels

Send tips and comments to dartsandlaurels@cjr.org

Dart to the Palo Alto Daily News, for blindly toeing the local line. “Everybody,” as was noted on Slate’s... More


Assignment Iraq

A note from the editors

In the middle of 2003, not long after President Bush landed on the USS Abraham Lincoln in May to tell... More

Ideas & Reviews


The Desegregation Drama

The white news media came late to the scene. But when they finally did arrive, the battle was joined.

The Race Beat The Civil Rights Struggle, and the Awakening of a Nation by Gene Roberts and Hank... More


Fear of Yoga

Today, everybody, including the press, loves the Hindu practice of health and spirituality. But it took a couple of centuries to get there.

Yoga is the Survivor of the culture wars: unbloodied, unmuddied, unbothered by the media’s slings and arrows, its leotard still... More

The Research Report

Inside Jokes

A new take on news and late-night comedy, and a parsing of journalistic courage

AAfter White House-bound Bill Clinton donned shades and played the sax on The Arsenio Hall Show in June 1992, a... More

New survey reveals everything you think about freelancing is true - Data from Project Word quantifies challenges of freelance investigative reporting

Why one editor won’t run any more op-eds by the Heritage Foundation’s top economist - A reply to Paul Krugman on state taxes and job growth made some incorrect claims

Why we ‘stave off’ colds - It all started with wine

The New Republic, then and now - Tallying the staff turnover at the overhauled magazine

Why serious journalism can coexist with audience-pleasing content - Legacy media organizations should experiment with digital platforms while continuing to publish hard news

The rise of feelings journalism (TNR)

“Bloom engaged in an increasingly popular style of writing, which I’ve discussed on my blog before, which I call “feelings journalism.” It involves a writer making an argument based on what they imagine someone else is thinking, what they feel may be another person’s feelings. The realm of fact, of reporting, has been left behind.”

Things a war correspondent should never say (WSJ)

“The correspondent retelling war stories surely knows that fellow correspondents had faced the same dangers or worse”

On WaPo trying to interview a cow (National Journal)

“‘I wasn’t milked on the White House lawn by a strange man,’ The Washington Post—the venerable institution that would later come to break the Watergate scandal and win 48 Pulitzers—quoted her, a farm animal, as saying”


Greg Marx discusses democracy and news with Tom Rosenstiel of the American Press Institute

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The Business of Digital Journalism

A report from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Study Guides

Questions and exercises for journalism students.