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The Magazine

November/December 2008




Journalism’s battle for relevance in an 
age of too much information

In 2007, as part of the third round of strategic planning for its digital transformation, The Associated Press decided to... More


Surface Routines

How we read on the Web

Overload—the amount people feel compelled to know combined with the volume of information they have to sift through in order... More


Picture This

The infographic comes of age

The infographic was among man's earliest means of communication (think petroglyph), yet after millennia of evolution, this marriage of text... More


Trimming the Hedges

Web jungle, Web garden—you decide

It may seem like people have been gawking at the proliferation of online news sources for ages now, but it... More


At Risk in Mexico

Drug violence is silencing the press

On November 13, Mexican crime reporter Armando Rodriguez was killed outside his Juarez home by an unknown attacker. Rodriguez covered... More


Murrow’s Boy

Dan Rather in high definition

The headquarters of Dan Rather Reports is a small, disheveled space just off Times Square in Manhattan, cluttered with temporary... More


Music Lessons

What journalists could learn from Kid Rock, Lil Wayne, and Bon Iver

He takes the stage clad in a black turtleneck. his famous line is, “Green is the new red, white, and... More



Fed-up newsrooms want a voice in their future

When her Contra Costa Times colleagues compared her union organizing efforts to those of Norma Rae, Sara Steffens rented the... More


False Readings

How the Gross Domestic Product leads us astray

It is 7:30 a.m. in washington and a bevy of reporters files into the Department of Commerce, which is kitty-corner... More



Drawing Lines

Why do we let political operatives act like journalists?

Nicholas Kristof and William Kristol both write regular columns about politics and policy for the New York Times op-ed page.... More


Let’s Talk About Sex(ism)

How the media handled gender during the campaign

It’s by now understood that sexism, in some form, lodged itself into the gears of this election cycle from the... More


A Little Something for Your Trouble

Buyout packages at papers around the country

Since January 2007, as the shrinking of our newsrooms continued apace, some 2,700 journalists accepted buyouts and moved on. Here... More


Ties That Blind

Following the funding trail in health and medical reporting

For nearly thirty years, the editors of medical journals have relied on public disclosure of researchers’ conflicts of interest to... More

Darts and Laurels

A Laurel to the Rocky Mountain News

Send tips and suggestions to

Laurel to the Rocky Mountain News for uncovering a systemic effort by a federal Department of Labor program to deny... More

Ideas & Reviews


Absolutely Sensational!

The rise and fall and rise of the tabloid press

The Godfather of Tabloid: Generoso Pope Jr. and the National Enquirer
By Jack Vitek
University Press of Kentucky 290 pages, $29.95 The... More

New survey reveals everything you think about freelancing is true - Data from Project Word quantifies challenges of freelance investigative reporting

Why one editor won’t run any more op-eds by the Heritage Foundation’s top economist - A reply to Paul Krugman on state taxes and job growth made some incorrect claims

Why we ‘stave off’ colds - It all started with wine

The New Republic, then and now - Tallying the staff turnover at the overhauled magazine

Why serious journalism can coexist with audience-pleasing content - Legacy media organizations should experiment with digital platforms while continuing to publish hard news

The rise of feelings journalism (TNR)

“Bloom engaged in an increasingly popular style of writing, which I’ve discussed on my blog before, which I call “feelings journalism.” It involves a writer making an argument based on what they imagine someone else is thinking, what they feel may be another person’s feelings. The realm of fact, of reporting, has been left behind.”

Things a war correspondent should never say (WSJ)

“The correspondent retelling war stories surely knows that fellow correspondents had faced the same dangers or worse”

On WaPo trying to interview a cow (National Journal)

“‘I wasn’t milked on the White House lawn by a strange man,’ The Washington Post—the venerable institution that would later come to break the Watergate scandal and win 48 Pulitzers—quoted her, a farm animal, as saying”


Greg Marx discusses democracy and news with Tom Rosenstiel of the American Press Institute

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Who Owns What

The Business of Digital Journalism

A report from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Study Guides

Questions and exercises for journalism students.