Thursday, July 24, 2014. Last Update: Thu 3:45 PM EST

Tags

Business Insider

deutsche_bank.jpg

Audit Notes: WSJ Libor scoop, Business Insider, reader revenue

Deutsche Bank made big money betting on the rigged rate

The Wall Street Journal posts an interesting page-one report on Deutsche Bank and the big profits it made betting on... More

Blodget Asks a Taboo Question on Wages and Profits

I like this Henry Blodget thought experiment on how much more major companies could afford to compensate their ill-paid employees.... More

Business Insider and Financial Press Sensationalism

Henry Blodget & Co. stroke the id of the Internet

What business press readers always lacked but never really needed was a tabloid sensationalist to hype up mundane markets and... More

Business Insider and Over-Aggregation

Henry Blodget has a long and detailed response to Marco Arment, which is fascinating to anybody interested in the nuts... More

Business Insider’s Barcelona Junket

Victoria Barret reports on the nice little deal that Dan Frommer has going on in Barcelona: "Samsung was generous enough... More

GE Flubs a Pushback Against The New York Times

The company can’t—or won’t—get its story straight on taxes

General Electric went into full public-relations pushback mode after The New York Times's damaging story Friday on how it avoids... More

LinkedIn Bubble Trouble

How to report (and what not to leave out) on signs of frothiness in Silicon Valley

I've had a bit of a back and forth on Twitter in the last day with Business Insider's Joe Weisenthal,... More

Misinformation On Killed and Injured Photographers

Sad news brings a lesson on caution

There has been much confusion in the wake of reports that documentary filmmaker Tim Hetherington was killed today in... More

Sourcing Trayvon Martin “Photos” From Stormfront

Not a good idea, Business Insider

Business Insider runs a linkbait post with a graphic of Trayvon Martin images it found on the neonazi website Stormfront.... More

The AP Falls For a Bogus Press Release

No excuse for that silly mistake but points for cleaning up the mess

Henry Blodget wants to know if we're going to blast the Associated Press for falling for a hoax press release... More

The Huffington Post’s Tainted Money

The befuddled legacy customers of AOL fund a bubble-era premium for Arianna & Company

Say what you will about Arianna Huffington's decision to sell out to AOL—and we will below—she's no dummy. Of the... More

How Forbes got to $475 million - That’s what a Hong Kong investor has agreed to pay for a firm that two years ago had trouble paying its rent

Are female journalists up to the job of a Jill Abramson interview? - Reporters avoid unflattering discussion about her firing

How to check if that viral video is true - Journalists don’t always verify user-generated content, so readers need to learn how to verify what they see online

The Grand Dame of Florida reporting has retired twice, but she’s still causing trouble - A conversation with the Tampa Bay Times’ Lucy Morgan

Brick by brick - After years of shrinking ambition at The Washington Post, Jeff Bezos has the paper thinking global domination


The 10 worst New Yorker longreads (Gawker)

“[A]pparently [Adam] Gopnik did not know you could bake fancy breads from France and other cultures. So he got his mom to teach him how to bake them. A fine anecdote, maybe, to tell a friend or a therapist. But in this case he wrote about it for the New Yorker, a magazine.”

Insufferable parenthetical asides, ranked (The Hairpin)

18. (strictly for the mise-en-scene)

You are now entering the demented kingdom of William T. Vollmann (TNR)

“Franzen tells a hilarious story of being a young writer in New York, meeting Vollmann, becoming fast friends, and inaugurating a draft swap. A while later, they exchanged work. Franzen gave Vollmann a dozen chiseled pages. Vollmann gave Franzen an entire novel.”

Bloggingheads

Greg Marx discusses democracy and news with Tom Rosenstiel of the American Press Institute

  • If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $19.95 (6 issues in all).
  • If not, simply write cancel on the bill and return it. You will owe nothing.

Who Owns What

The Business of Digital Journalism

A report from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Study Guides

Questions and exercises for journalism students.