Sunday, March 01, 2015. Last Update: Fri 2:51 PM EST

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Summer Movie Club

Absence of Malice (1981)

When bad journalism kills

When I was a student in journalism school, in the beginning of my first semester, one of the professors of... More

Ace in the Hole (1951)

What a sixty-year-old noir can tell us about the Murdoch hacking scandal

I’ve got Murdoch on the brain, but I couldn’t help thinking about the News of the World scandal while watching... More

Almost Famous (2000)

Who’s afraid of Rolling Stone?

Beware, beware, Rolling Stone magazine... Music, inarguably, is the hero, the emotional engine in Almost Famous, the Cameron Crowe-written, -directed... More

Call Northside 777 (1948)

Real journalism is too boring for the movies

In an early scene of the 1948 film Call Northside 777, Jimmy Stewart, who plays a reporter at the Chicago... More

Fletch (1985)

Getting the story, one quip at a time

Irwin Fletcher, Fletch to his friends, is an investigative reporter for a Los Angeles newspaper. He writes his columns under... More

Good Night, and Good Luck (2005)

What happened to TV news?

The marketing team behind Good Night, and Good Luck (2005), a biopic of Edward R. Murrow set largely amid the... More

Newsies (1992)

“Headlines don’t sell papes; newsies sell papes”

Before Christian Bale became Batman, he was Jack Kelly, a newspaper boy with a dream in his heart and calluses... More

Superman

The Man of Steel has better things to do than be a reporter

When watching Superman (1978), I was reminded of the David Carradine rant from the end of Kill Bill: Vol. 2,... More

The Big Clock (1948)

A murderous publisher’s corporate noir

The Big Clock begins, as all stories about a desperate journalist ought to, with a drunken night. Charles Stroud, a... More

The Devil Wears Prada

The first entry in CJR’s summer movie club

The Devil Wears Prada is a film that exists two beats apart from reality. At least. Based on the book... More

The Parallax View (1974)

(Sometimes) Good Guys Finish Last: Pakula’s sober counterpoint to All The President’s Men

It’s the Fourth of July in Seattle. We’re on the scene with Lee Carter, a young television reporter, who is... More

The Year of Living Dangerously (1982)

A group of hollow career fetishists and a moralizing dwarf

At the 1983 Academy Awards, a four-foot-nine dynamo of a New York stage actress named Linda Hunt took home the... More

Your Summer Movie Picks

Journalism-themed films recommended by CJR’s readers

Through these difficult times for journalism we could all use a little inspiration and a little fun. How about a... More

New survey reveals everything you think about freelancing is true - Data from Project Word quantifies challenges of freelance investigative reporting

Why one editor won’t run any more op-eds by the Heritage Foundation’s top economist - A reply to Paul Krugman on state taxes and job growth made some incorrect claims

Why we ‘stave off’ colds - It all started with wine

The New Republic, then and now - Tallying the staff turnover at the overhauled magazine

Why serious journalism can coexist with audience-pleasing content - Legacy media organizations should experiment with digital platforms while continuing to publish hard news


The rise of feelings journalism (TNR)

“Bloom engaged in an increasingly popular style of writing, which I’ve discussed on my blog before, which I call “feelings journalism.” It involves a writer making an argument based on what they imagine someone else is thinking, what they feel may be another person’s feelings. The realm of fact, of reporting, has been left behind.”

Things a war correspondent should never say (WSJ)

“The correspondent retelling war stories surely knows that fellow correspondents had faced the same dangers or worse”

On WaPo trying to interview a cow (National Journal)

“‘I wasn’t milked on the White House lawn by a strange man,’ The Washington Post—the venerable institution that would later come to break the Watergate scandal and win 48 Pulitzers—quoted her, a farm animal, as saying”

Bloggingheads

Greg Marx discusses democracy and news with Tom Rosenstiel of the American Press Institute

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The Business of Digital Journalism

A report from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

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Questions and exercises for journalism students.