Monday, October 20, 2014. Last Update: Fri 3:05 PM EST

Second Read

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The Tea Party is timeless

Richard Hofstadter’s Anti-Intellectualism In American Life reviewed

Anti-Intellectualism in American Life doesn’t seem like a catchy title, but, more than 50 years on, it has demonstrated... More

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Uncommon ground

J. Anthony Lukas realized something larger than the truth

In the fall of 1974, black schoolchildren from Boston's Roxbury neighborhood climbed into school buses bound for South Boston,... More

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America’s secret fetish

Daniel Patrick Moynihan’s Secrecy: The American Experience is an optimistic book; reading it today brings despair

The ease with which the United States government creates new state secrets masks the ultimate cost of the secret's... More

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In the name of the father

An editor who soared, then flew away

Here are some of the things and people that my father loved: Gregorian chant, Joe Louis, airplanes, the Detroit... More

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Clarion call

The future of the alternative press can be found in its past

Alt-media maven Stephen Mindich, longtime publisher of the Boston Phoenix, in 1976. (Peter Simon) I spent the morning of... More

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Home truths

For the essayist Albert Murray, the South was a state of mind

Editor's note: Essayist, critic, and novelist Albert Murray died on Sunday at his home in Harlem. He was 97. Earlier... More

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Gorky peek

The Second Russian Revolution gave viewers an unprecedented glimpse inside a rapidly liberalizing Soviet Union

In the spring of 1989, after decades of being kept out in the cold by Communist secrecy and propaganda,... More

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A beautiful mind

In Is There No Place on Earth for Me?, Susan Sheehan told the complete story of one woman’s struggles with schizophrenia

There were times when the lobby of The Village Voice seemed to be a magnet for crazy people. When... More

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Human capital

In O Albany!, William Kennedy pays homage to the hard-to-love city that is his novels’ greatest hero

On January 16, 1928, William Joseph Kennedy suffered a misfortune of birth only slightly preferable to bastardy. Having drawn... More

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Rocky Mountain fever

Gene Fowler’s Timber Line celebrates the chicanery and showmanship of the original Denver Post

In the winter of 1907, Denver showed the rest of the nation how to fight a newspaper war. The... More

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Look back on anger

At his best, Ambrose Bierce used vicious satire to puncture the smug complacency of America’s Gilded Age

I s journalist, short-story writer, and poet Ambrose Bierce one of the biggest SOBs in American literature? He is certainly... More

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Laboratory confidential

The Double Helix’s warts-and-all portrayal of scientific pursuits shook up the formal world of science writing

W hen The Double Helix appeared in the winter of 1968, I reviewed it for The Laureate, the literary magazine... More

The Auteurs’ Caretaker

Penelope Gilliatt didn’t care about movies as much as she cared about the people who made them

In 1968, New Yorker editor William Shawn decided to start taking the movies seriously. Up to that point, the... More

The Road Book

Before Ernie Pyle went to war, he wrote about America

In the spring of 1932, Ernie Pyle took over as the new managing editor of The Washington Daily News,... More

How the Past Saw the Present

The future of journalism has always been on journalism’s mind

CJR knew about the iPad a good fifteen years before there was an iPad to know about. In a... More

PBS pulls ads from Harper’s Magazine after critical essay - Piece argues public broadcaster has fallen under the sway of political influence and outside money

Should all journalists be on Twitter? - Reasons to take up or forgo the 140-character platform

Chris Hondros: How He Got that Picture - From CJR’s Covering Iraq oral history

Beware journo-speak - Only journalists would call a tragedy a “mishap”

Will feminist writers save Playboy? - As Playboy’s safe-for-work site has passed the one-month mark, a look at the online media’s bedazzled reactions, and how the new image suits the old brand


Lawmakers on why they’re mired in place (Esquire)

Mark Warren “spoke with 90 members of the House and Senate about what’s gone so wrong in Congress. Sometimes it got a little emotional.”

My childhood friend, the ISIS jihadist (Mashable)

How a young Danish man turned extremist

What it’s like to carry a Nobel Prize through Fargo (SciAm)

“And they’re like, ‘Uhhhh. Who gave this to you?’ ‘The King of Sweden.’ ‘Why did he give this to you?’ ‘Because I helped discover the expansion rate of the universe was accelerating.’”

Newspapers prefer lesbians (Bloomberg)

In five states that just got gay marriage, the vast majority of local papers covered it with photos of women getting hitched

Bloggingheads

Greg Marx discusses democracy and news with Tom Rosenstiel of the American Press Institute

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Who Owns What

The Business of Digital Journalism

A report from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Study Guides

Questions and exercises for journalism students.