Thursday, July 24, 2014. Last Update: Thu 3:45 PM EST

The Audit

Megabanks on Steroids

The Journal examines how the too big just keep getting bigger

The Wall Street Journal has an excellent page-one story this morning on how giant banks are getting bigger and throttling... More

Audit Notes: GPOs, Broadcom Injustice, The Upside of BP

Mariah Blake has a must-read investigation in The Washington Monthly on the for-profit group purchasing organizations that dominate the medical... More

Bloomberg’s Obama Bull

Bloomberg's back on the "Obama's Bull Market" stuff. Remember when it was "Obama's Bear Market"—six weeks into his presidency, and... More

FT: Wall Street Opacity Survives

The Financial Times looks at how complexity and opacity plays into Wall Street's hands at the potential expense of its... More

Mind the Gap

Politico looks at how Washington elites see the economy

Politico has the smart idea to compare how the American public sees the economy and what “Washington’s governing class” thinks.... More

Audit Notes: Kanjorski?, Top 1 Percent, Geithner vs. Warren

Simon Johnson has been beating the drum a bit on something called the Kanjorksi Amendment that made its way into... More

The Goldman Settlement Coverage is Mostly On-Target

The press does a pretty good job of handling the SEC's settlement with Goldman Sachs (an Audit funder). It seems... More

Audit Notes: The SEC Lets Goldman Off Easy

So Goldman Sachs (an Audit funder) gets off the hook with a $550 million fine and with no apology. But... More

Audit D.C. Notes: Sweetheart Deals, Tax Talk, Commission Coverage

The Wall Street Journal does well by staying on top of the controversial Countrywide lending program that provided sweet deals... More

What They Don’t Know

The press has work to do on the deficit debate

With all the buzz about cutting the deficit, the press should be all over the job of explaining how much... More

WSJ on the Lookout for Poor Lending

The Wall Street Journal has its ear to the ground for signs of bubble-era lending, and it's come up with... More

Audit Notes: Bloomberg Misses, Indiviglio Hits, Shadow Banking

Bloomberg puts a strangely positive spin on a Goldman Sachs story, and Felix Salmon calls them out on it. Here's... More

WSJ Tries to Tie Farmers to Bank Reform, Fails

The Wall Street Journal blows it big time with a hyped-up page-one story on how the financial-reform bill would affect... More

Anatomy of a Zombie Lie

The AP and the “charging $12.50 to quote five words” meme

As I wrote last week, bloggers have repeatedly pumped the story that the AP charges us to quote its stories.... More

Sorkin Types Up Hank Paulson’s Historical Revisionism

The ex-Treasury secretary, Wall Street CEO until mid-2006, gets a free ride

Andrew Ross Sorkin lets Hank Paulson spin away this morning in a column about the former Treasury Secretary's thoughts on... More

How Forbes got to $475 million - That’s what a Hong Kong investor has agreed to pay for a firm that two years ago had trouble paying its rent

Are female journalists up to the job of a Jill Abramson interview? - Reporters avoid unflattering discussion about her firing

How to check if that viral video is true - Journalists don’t always verify user-generated content, so readers need to learn how to verify what they see online

The Grand Dame of Florida reporting has retired twice, but she’s still causing trouble - A conversation with the Tampa Bay Times’ Lucy Morgan

Brick by brick - After years of shrinking ambition at The Washington Post, Jeff Bezos has the paper thinking global domination


The 10 worst New Yorker longreads (Gawker)

“[A]pparently [Adam] Gopnik did not know you could bake fancy breads from France and other cultures. So he got his mom to teach him how to bake them. A fine anecdote, maybe, to tell a friend or a therapist. But in this case he wrote about it for the New Yorker, a magazine.”

Insufferable parenthetical asides, ranked (The Hairpin)

18. (strictly for the mise-en-scene)

You are now entering the demented kingdom of William T. Vollmann (TNR)

“Franzen tells a hilarious story of being a young writer in New York, meeting Vollmann, becoming fast friends, and inaugurating a draft swap. A while later, they exchanged work. Franzen gave Vollmann a dozen chiseled pages. Vollmann gave Franzen an entire novel.”

Bloggingheads

Greg Marx discusses democracy and news with Tom Rosenstiel of the American Press Institute

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The Business of Digital Journalism

A report from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Study Guides

Questions and exercises for journalism students.