Bloomberg scoops that the SEC will not (“probably”) file charges against anyone for the collapse of Lehman Brothers:

Under a heading reading “Activity in Last Four Weeks,” the undated document reads, “The staff has concluded its investigation and determined that charges will likely not be recommended.”

In a 2010 report, Valukas said Lehman used transactions known as Repo 105s to hide billions of dollars in assets and artificially reduce the firm’s leverage. In a typical repo agreement, one party temporarily transfers a security to another as collateral for short-term cash. A Repo 105 transaction requires extra collateral, making it a more costly form of borrowing. Those deals were accounted for by Lehman as “sales,” as opposed to financing transactions, Valukas said…

In its final year, Lehman overvalued real-estate holdings, including a stake in U.S. apartment developer Archstone-Smith Trust, Valukas said. Lehman and Tishman Speyer Properties LP completed a joint acquisition of Archstone for $22 billion, including debt, in October 2007.

Valukas handed them a case or three, but they still come up with nuttin’.

Ryan Chittum is a former Wall Street Journal reporter, and deputy editor of The Audit, CJR's business section. If you see notable business journalism, give him a heads-up at rc2538@columbia.edu.