Gary Weiss says the tarnishing of Warren Buffett is a useful moment for the press to stand back and quit the CEO worship. Indeed:

The annual “we love Warren” extravaganza long ago acquired many of the aspects of a cult ritual, and we in the media were right there with the shareholders, sipping the Kool-Aid. But this year’s Buffett-fest was different. For the first time, the adulatory press coverage soured a bit. The media isn’t negative by any means, but this time — and it was long overdue — the tenor of the coverage was skeptical. For example, good takedowns of the annual Buffett love-fest were written by Joe Nocera of the New York Times and Allan Dodds Frank of the Daily Beast, and there was solid work throughout the Omaha press corps. Good work, guys. Keep it up.

I mean it. Let’s keep this non-honeymoon going on forever. As a matter of fact, the adulation directed at Buffett, who repaid it with a tawdry insider trading scandal, is a lesson to us all. Sure, CEO porn is alluring. Sure, rich people are inherently fascinating, virtuous and fantastic individuals. Sure, billionaire investors can do no wrong. The media acted that way before the financial crisis of 2008 and still does. I don’t expect that to change everywhere, but I do think that Buffett is a good place to start.

Alas, CEO porn and Buffett worship is so ingrained in the business-press culture it will always be with. It just ebbs and flows—a pattern that correlates pretty well with whatever the Dow happens to be doing the last couple of months.

The Economist’s Ryan Avent rips into the macroeconomic ideas of Paul Ryan, the Republicans’ latest Ayn Rand-lovin’ front man.

Avent on Ryan’s call for the Fed to rein in its loose money policy:

And then there’s the money issue. It wasn’t so long ago that both parties supported countercyclical monetary policy. Top economists from across the ideological spectrum—from Milton Friedman to Christina Romer—point to tight monetary policy as a major factor exacerbating and prolonging the Great Depression. Mr Ryan claims he’s worried about inflation. But based on what markets are saying, 10-year expected inflation is just 1.94%. That is, according to the Cleveland Fed, “the public currently expects the inflation rate to be less than 2 percent on average over the next decade”. Mr Ryan said that he wished the Fed would drop its mandate for full employment and focus on price stability. Well, current inflation expectations indicate that tighter policy would maintain inflation below the Fed’s implicit target of around 2%, which is the level of inflation most rich-country central banks have decided is conducive to stable prices and growth. Moreover, Mr Ryan’s suggestion that high inflation is imminent cuts directly against the prevailing market view. That’s a fine belief to have, provided you aren’t spending your time arguing that markets know best and need to be free to guide the economy.

Paul Krugman says Ryan’s views are evidence of the Republican Party’s descent into a “Dark Ages of macroeconomics.”

— Finally, let me push my colleague Justin Peters’s piece over at Slate on the culinary wonders of Sbarro, “America’s least essential restaurant.” This is my kind of food journalism:

Beyond pizza, the restaurant also offers a full line of Italian-American steam table delicacies. At the dirty, cavernous Sbarro attached to Penn Station, where I was accosted by a mumbling beggar while waiting to order, I paired the pizza with a plate of baked ziti, which was similarly rank and unappetizing. The ziti had been sitting in the pan for awhile, and all components of the dish had dried out, such that it was brittle where it should have been soft, like some failed avant-garde culinary experiment.

Ryan Chittum is a former Wall Street Journal reporter, and deputy editor of The Audit, CJR's business section. If you see notable business journalism, give him a heads-up at rc2538@columbia.edu.