The Monthly story also does a good job explaining how the Chamber orchestrates grassroots and media campaigns around the country, even using local political operatives to set up front groups, keeping its member companies out of the spotlight. This is interesting, and important, stuff:

In other words, a large part of what the Chamber sells is political cover. For multibillion-dollar insurers, drug makers, and medical device manufacturers who are too smart and image conscious to make public attacks of their own, the Chamber of Commerce is a friend who will do the dirty work. “I want to give them all the deniability they need,” says Donohue. That deniability is evidently worth a lot. According to a January article in the National Journal, six insurers alone—Aetna, Cigna, Humana, Kaiser Foundation Health Plans, UnitedHealth Group, and Wellpoint—pumped up to $20 million into the Chamber last year.

That’s a lot of good context. Too bad Post readers didn’t get some of it, to help them judge just what kind of a season the Chamber is having.

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Holly Yeager is CJR's Peterson Fellow, covering fiscal and economic policy. She is based in Washington and reachable at holly.yeager@gmail.com.