Tuesday, September 23, 2014. Last Update: Tue 3:25 PM EST

The Observatory

Is Futurity the Future?

Citing a lack of science coverage, universities launch their own “newswire”

Citing the decline of science coverage in the mainstream news media, thirty-five of the country’s top universities have banded together... More

Science Needs a Storyline

The question is not if, but how scientists should frame their research

Journalists choose an angle for every story they write. Should scientists do the same when explaining the import of their... More

From Hudson to 9/11

Times smartly pairs two lower-Manhattan anniversaries

Remember remember the month of September. So says a smart tribute in today’s New York Times, pairing the eighth anniversary... More

Research, Not Relations…

Why scientists should leave communications to the pros

A piece in The Observatory last week lamented the fact that Rajenda Pachauri, the chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on... More

EPA Targets Major Emitters

Journal sees an admission that limiting carbon will be costly

The Environmental Protection Agency sent a “tailoring rule” to the White House for consideration on Saturday that would limit regulation... More

When Kennedy Didn’t Compromise

Lessons from the senator’s early health reform failure

I join the chorus of those who have long admired Sen. Edward M. Kennedy’s remarkable Senate career and his persistence... More

Can Science Be “Humanized?”

Or is democracy doomed, Harper’s wonders

There is a hauntingly dystopian headline in the September issue of Harper’s Magazine: “Dehumanized: When math and science rule the... More

Media Hype Swine Flu Report

Coverage of possible death toll ranges from wrong to remedial

On Monday, the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology released a report (pdf) about the possible impact of... More

Forbes on ExxonMobil: “Green Company of the Year”

Really?

What an eye-grabber! “ExxonMobil: Green Company of Year.” I mean, who woulda thunk it? Too bad the provocative headline of... More

March of the Politicians

Journal calls out Congress’s climate-change junket Down Under

On Saturday, The Wall Street Journal fronted an article about a trip that ten members of Congress took last year... More

Writing Wrongs

Journals’ call to publish scientific setbacks is an opportunity for journalists

For journalists, some scientific flops are just too good to pass up. Think of the Large Hadron Collider’s failure to... More

It’s Tanking; I’m Teaching…

And other current events in the tumultuous world of science journalism

Following the fiftieth fortieth anniversary of the first moon landing two weeks ago, The Observatory ran a short round-up of... More

Clunkers, the Economy, and the Environment

When it comes to “green,” reporters focus on the pocketbook

Since the Department of Transportation announced last Thursday that new-car buyers had bankrupted the “cash for clunkers” rebate initiative in... More

Fuel for Thought

Once credulous, biofuels coverage grows skeptical

Fuel from corn. Fuel from coffee grounds. Fuel from chicken feathers. Whatever the recipe, the search for a replacement for... More

(E)mission Impossible?

Blogs, Web sites provide climate policy analysis lacking elsewhere

After the recent Group 8 meeting in Italy, news outlets released a flood of reports about certain developing countries—led by... More

Stop using ‘Brooklyn’ to mean hipster neighborhoods - Elite-oriented outlets typically only cover the borough’s most affluent, Manhattan-adjacent neighborhoods

The Reporters Committee is about to start suing people to help journalists - Katie Townsend joins the organization as its first litigation director

How a Nebraska newspaper kicked off a major prison sentencing scandal - The Omaha World-Herald found that hundreds of inmates were being released early

On media freedom, United Nations plays by its own rules - Months of international crises raises the stakes for reporting on the UN, but investigative journalists remain without a right to information

Keep calm and write a headline worth reading - Ease up on the exaggerations because someday you may need those explosive adjectives when a truly big story lands


Female sportscasters are speaking up (NYT)

“[i]n the wake of the recent scandals, women have been driving the story, providing a perspective that their male counterparts simply cannot”

Adviser of high school paper that refused to use ‘Redskins’ suspended (Student Press Law Center)

“Amid a months-long battle with administrators for editorial control … the Playwickian’s faculty adviser was suspended for two days this week”

Apple’s ‘warrant canary’ disappears (GigaOm)

Apple included language in its first Transparency Report to say that it had not been subject to a Section 215 Patriot Act request. That language is now gone.

Trend Piece (New Yorker)

Buzzword, buzzword, buzzword. Isn’t the buzzword on your mind now? Perhaps it is on other people’s minds? Read on or you’ll be clueless, dated, and without any friends in the world. Buzzword again!

Bloggingheads

Greg Marx discusses democracy and news with Tom Rosenstiel of the American Press Institute

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Who Owns What

The Business of Digital Journalism

A report from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Study Guides

Questions and exercises for journalism students.