Thursday, October 27, 2016. Last Update: Fri 2:51 PM EST

United States Project


‘Turning point’ claims ‘in tatters’

After historic health care decision, some commentators set out on fruitless search for campaign narrative

Yesterday’s Supreme Court decision upholding most of the Affordable Care Act has vast implications for health policy in this country... More


A laurel to Denver’s Westword

Alt-weekly scours TV stations’ public files for details on political spending

For months now, CJR has been urging the FCC to improve public access to the “public inspection files” maintained... More


Political money talks. PolitiFact Virginia listens—and then talks back

As campaign ads swamp the Commonwealth, site aims to “explain what the facts are”

VIRGINIA — Need proof that Virginia is a battleground state in the 2012 election? In one recent week, the presidential... More


The new media narrative: ‘no-policy’ Romney

Three things reporters should remember as they press Romney for policy details

Lately, Mitt Romney is losing his reputation in the media as a politician who constantly flip-flops from one policy position... More


Another recommended LAT read on campaign finance

The paper offers a timely look at the disclosure fight

Last month, The Swing States Project singled out the good work of the Los Angeles Times’s Matea Gold and Joseph... More


Explaining how Ohio ‘really works’

Columnist Thomas Suddes works in the political “lab” that is the Buckeye State

During the somewhat less frantic months of the presidential campaign season—between the primaries and the nominating conventions—the Swing States Project... More


Romney’s ‘job killer’ narrative: time for an X-ray

Some reporters are asking: Does Obamacare really destroy jobs?, which bills itself as Ohio’s channel for news, is one of the latest media outlets to casually pass along... More


Driving the discourse in Detroit

As a region’s media landscape shifts, a public radio program fills a void

During the somewhat less frantic months of the presidential campaign season—between the primaries and the nominating conventions—the Swing States Project... More


Whaddya know—advertising works!

The Times continues the conversation about Obamacare and public opinion

If anyone ever doubted that advertising works, the latest example of its persuasive power, documented in The New York Times... More


In Colorado Springs, inconsistent coverage of a colorful campaign

Gazette’s webcast interview demands follow-up, while KOAA’s “truth checks” deliver

COLORADO — One of the most colorful and competitive GOP primary battles is being waged in the conservative bastion of... More


Embracing the myth of the campaign wizard, again

The Jim Messina profile industry is part of a long tradition

Maybe it began with the lionization in the press of the Irish Mafia that helped elect John Kennedy in 1960.... More


Harrisburg’s Patriot-News sits down with Romney

There are lessons here for campaign reporters and editors along future bus tour routes

PENNSYLVANIA — While campaigns and aligned PACs are raising and spending hundreds of millions of dollars, old-school, retail politics has... More


A laurel to WaPo’s debunking of ‘EPA drones’

David Fahrenthold chronicles the “life cycle of a falsehood”

Starting today, we’ll be bringing a venerable CJR tradition, Darts & Laurels, to The Swing States Project. Each Wednesday,... More


The failure to explain health reform

The public doesn’t understand it. Whose fault is that?

If the Supreme Court rules the health reform law or its central feature—the individual mandate requiring people to have health... More


When ads attack in Virginia

Roanoke’s WSLS-TV, Hampton Roads’ Daily Press did more than repeat claims and counter-claims

VIRGINIA — Turn on a local morning television newscast on any given day in Virginia and you’ll likely get a... More

New survey reveals everything you think about freelancing is true - Data from Project Word quantifies challenges of freelance investigative reporting

Why one editor won’t run any more op-eds by the Heritage Foundation’s top economist - A reply to Paul Krugman on state taxes and job growth made some incorrect claims

Why we ‘stave off’ colds - It all started with wine

The New Republic, then and now - Tallying the staff turnover at the overhauled magazine

Why serious journalism can coexist with audience-pleasing content - Legacy media organizations should experiment with digital platforms while continuing to publish hard news

The rise of feelings journalism (TNR)

“Bloom engaged in an increasingly popular style of writing, which I’ve discussed on my blog before, which I call “feelings journalism.” It involves a writer making an argument based on what they imagine someone else is thinking, what they feel may be another person’s feelings. The realm of fact, of reporting, has been left behind.”

Things a war correspondent should never say (WSJ)

“The correspondent retelling war stories surely knows that fellow correspondents had faced the same dangers or worse”

On WaPo trying to interview a cow (National Journal)

“‘I wasn’t milked on the White House lawn by a strange man,’ The Washington Post—the venerable institution that would later come to break the Watergate scandal and win 48 Pulitzers—quoted her, a farm animal, as saying”


Greg Marx discusses democracy and news with Tom Rosenstiel of the American Press Institute

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