Reporters are still—to this day—forced to beg, scrape, snuffle, and pry information loose the best they can from anonymous sources. From the case of the source in Bloomberg’s Goldman profile—Mr./Ms. “Wouldn’t Have Lost Money”—we know these sources have their own hidden, bogus agendas. This source was trying to pretend the AIG bailout didn’t matter to Goldman. My eye.

Finally, get a load of the answers to Bloomberg’s Pittman when he asked the relevant public agencies and the government-owned AIG which counterparties are receiving U.S. bailout money:

“What AIG did with its money, you should call AIG,’” said Fed spokesman Calvin Mitchell. “I doubt that we will be talking about AIG’s CDO portfolio.’”

And:

AIG spokesman Nicholas Ashooh said the company would not disclose its counterparties or the contents of the CDO portfolio. He declined further comment.

And:

Treasury spokeswoman Brookly McLaughlin said, “The Fed had the lead on this one: It’s their loan. I don’t know how I could be more clear.”’

I don’t know how I could be more clear, Brookly: This stinks.

The case for AIG-bailout transparency is obvious. The Columbia Journalism Review is ready to stand with anyone interested in forcing disclosure of taxpayer spending on Wall Street. Just email me at dean@deanstarkman.com.

Dean Starkman Dean Starkman runs The Audit, CJR's business section, and is the author of The Watchdog That Didn't Bark: The Financial Crisis and the Disappearance of Investigative Journalism (Columbia University Press, January 2014).

Follow Dean on Twitter: @deanstarkman.