Tuesday, September 02, 2014. Last Update: Tue 7:00 AM EST

Fiftieth Anniversary

Caro’s Way

Even after 2,600 pages, LBJ remains elusive

It was the most contested election in the history of Texas. On August 28, 1948, Lyndon B. Johnson, a ruthless... More

A Baghdad Journal

At stake: $18.6 billion for the rebuilding of Iraq. The players: The Pentagon, the White House, the press, and one loyal public affairs officer worrying about his job. Here is his unofficial story.

Baghdad, Iraq, Sunday, December 21, 2003. After a chilly daybreak, my mind is racing with recollections of the past few... More

Tin Soldier

An American Vigilante In Afghanistan, Using the Press for Profit and Glow

In April 2004, a former U.S. Special Forces soldier named Jonathan Keith Idema started shopping a sizzling story to the... More

PM: an anniversary assessment

Why a left-leaning New York tabloid failed

PM was a liberal tabloid published in New York from 1939 to 1948. As Lewis Donohew explained in CJR’s Summer... More

Press agent—but still President

No President has monitored his public image with more zeal than LBJ

Ben Bagdikian, who wrote regularly from Washington for CJR in the 1960s and ’70s, explained in our Summer 1965 issue... More

Cold War Comics

When “consistently propagandistic” funnies took on the Reds

In our Winter 1965 issue, Daniel J. Leab, then CJR's editorial assistant, compiled nearly 20 comic strips and frames that... More

Viet Nam reporting: three years of crisis

“A trying and sometimes hazardous business”

While he may be best known for the photo he took of a Buddhist monk's self-immolation, Associated Press correspondent Malcolm... More

Case history: Wilmington’s “independent” newspapers

Du Pont papers in a Du Pont town

In 1964, Ben Bagdikian, usually CJR’s Washington correspondent, looked north to Delaware, and examined the very heavy influence of the... More

The shadow of a gunman

An account of a twelve-year investigation of a Kennedy assassination film

What happens when a hard-nosed news organization gets a hold of an amateur film that maybe, just maybe, shows a... More

The Assassination: The Reporters’ Story

How journalists broke news of JFK’s death

Dallas: November 22, 1963. It’s a dateline that needs little introduction. But for reporters on the scene for President Kennedy’s... More

Birmingham: newspapers in a crisis

‘The papers appear to be almost as segregated as the city itself’

In our Summer 1963 issue, James Boylan, CJR’s founding editor, examined how local newspapers covered the Southern Christian Leadership Conference’s... More

The Computeriter revolution

A Utopian fiction

Our Spring 1963 issue included the only piece of science fiction CJR has ever published. Reporter Edward Edelson imagined with... More

Public policy in a newspaper strike

When New York City’s presses stopped, a lot went uncovered

New York city newspaper workers—including journalists, delivery truck drivers, and pressmen—went on strike on November 1, 1962. They would be... More

Television—“the President’s medium”?

How TV made JFK stronger than steel

Some historians credit President Kennedy’s 1960 election to his performance in his televised debates with Richard Nixon. His mastery of... More

A Plea for the Polls

‘The press seems to behave as if it were operating in a simpler yesterday’

Elmo Roper was one of the early giants of American opinion polling. His survey work for Fortune magazine, beginning in... More

Apple can’t hide from a 20-year-old reporter - The University of Michigan student gets behind the tech titan’s newest products

Al Jazeera America struggles to get off the margins - A quality-first strategy faces huge hurdles

Finding James Foley - This 2013 story takes a look at GlobalPost’s search for the photojournalist

Gannett cribs from Advance Publications playbook for struggling newspapers - Staff compete for fewer jobs; ‘readers become the assignment editor’

Cop corruption probe sparks newspaper feud - A spiked story is at the center of a bitter fight between Philadelphia’s two dailies


The impact of watching executions (PSmag)

“[E]xecutions, even for people who support capital punishment, and even when the criminals being put to death evoke little personal sympathy because of the nature of their crimes, take a toll on witnesses”

Times of India demands employee social media passwords (Quartz)

The company will possess log-in information and will be free to post any material to the account without journalists’ knowledge

Reconnecting with a story source, 17 years later (Hartford Courant)

“People who say reporters exploit people? You are right, we do. We parachute into people’s lives, sidle up, convince them that we care — and then disengage when the story is over. But that doesn’t mean we don’t connect, in a genuine way.”

The McDonald’s in Ferguson (LAT)

“Lately, the restaurant has taken on the appearance of a battered frontier outpost”

Bloggingheads

Greg Marx discusses democracy and news with Tom Rosenstiel of the American Press Institute

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Who Owns What

The Business of Digital Journalism

A report from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Study Guides

Questions and exercises for journalism students.