If you’ve been thinking, of late, that, at this decisive moment in the unfolding of our national narrative, the thing we all need to bring us together and restore our faith in each other and refresh our collective spirit and renew our vision for America’s future is a bunch of Beltway power-brokers getting together to belt out booze-fueled renditions of “Total Eclipse of the Heart”…then you, friend, are in luck.

Next Wednesday, at DC’s Rock and Roll Hotel*, political and media types (per the announcement, “Democrats, Republicans, House Members, Hill staffers, the media—and hopefully, YOU”) will get together for Karaoke in the Capital, which promises to celebrate American Democracy in the way the founders intended: through the wonder of song. (Ben Franklin—who, with Alexander Hamilton, apparently once performed a particularly kick-ass version of “Don’t Stop Believin’”—would be proud.)

As far as the event’s “media” attendance goes, known KitC participants at this point include Howie Kurtz profilee Christina Bellantoni (now of TPM), Mother Jones’s David Corn, and the Chicago Sun-Times’s Lynn Sweet. No word yet on the pols who’ll be performing; but, judging from the event’s publicity efforts thus far, they’ll be represented. Check out the Congresstastic wording of the announcement below, emphasis mine:

For at least one night in Washington, DC we can all get along in perfect harmony without singing in harmony.

Come sing a song, raise a glass, cheer your favorite singer, and applaud the other singers for making this a memorable night. Part of the proceeds will benefit Mr. Holland’s Opus Foundation, which will earmark our contribution to provide musical instruments for deserving Washington, DC schools and students. See you there!

Yes, you will. We might have to take the midnight train going anywhere…but we’ll be there.

* (Just to be clear, none of that is a typo.)

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Megan Garber is an assistant editor at the Nieman Journalism Lab at Harvard University. She was formerly a CJR staff writer.