Just as many rural communities face healthcare gaps—shortages of doctors, hospitals, and insurers—many also face healthcare-journalism gaps, as we reported last week. One of the journalists working to alleviate this problem is CJR’s own Trudy Lieberman. In addition to her duties at CJR and as a fellow at the Center for Advancing Health, Lieberman has also been contributing to the Rural Health News Service, writing bi-monthly “Thinking About Health” columns on healthcare issues that have been picked up free of charge by community newspapers in South Dakota, Colorado, and Lieberman’s home state of Nebraska—papers like the Steamboat Pilot & Today, the Gering Citizen, and the Mitchell Daily Republic.

The Rural Health News Service was the brainchild of Lieberman; Allen Beermann, executive director of the Nebraska Press Association, who began distributing Lieberman’s “Thinking About Health” columns to his member newspapers in Nebraska in 2012; Dennis Berens, former director of the Nebraska Office of Rural Health; and Barry Scholl of The Commonwealth Fund, which provides grant funding for the project (as well as for CJR’s The Second Opinion). The news service expanded to Colorado and South Dakota in 2013, and Beermann says as many as eight more states in the Midwest and Upper Midwest are considering signing on this year.

We spoke with Lieberman this week about her work with the Rural Health News Service, the challenges faced by small-town newspapers, and her advice for rural reporters looking to cover the effects of the Affordable Care Act in their communities. Edited excerpts follow.

Can you tell me about the origins and mission of the Rural Health News Service?

I was a visiting professor at the University of Nebraska College of Journalism in the fall of 2011. While I was there, Beermann, Berens, and I decided we would do a series of five panels in Lincoln and broadcast them throughout the state of Nebraska through the Nebraska Telehealth Network…. And these panels dealt with major health topics like Medicare, Medicaid, the cost of care, long-term care, healthcare financing in a global sense. And they were broadcast in hospitals across the state and in offices of local health departments…

The idea was to bring unbiased information to people of a rural state, who didn’t really have a lot of access to good quality information. We had assumed that most people read their community newspapers and listened to CNN, Fox, maybe the network news; maybe they read the larger papers like the Omaha World-Herald or Lincoln Journal Star, but outside of that it’s mostly the weeklies and dailies where they’re getting information.

These five panels were very successful, so we kept thinking about how do we continue this. The more we talked about it, the more it became clear that we would try this idea of a rural health news service, with me writing a column appropriate for these audiences twice a month. And it would be sent out through Allen Beermann’s offices… and then it gets picked up by the papers.

The mission is to provide unbiased, clear information about healthcare to readers of community newspapers. When we set out to do this, we realized that when we think about healthcare, there’s a lot of misinformation, disinformation and no information, and we wanted to combat all of that.

Few papers in this region would probably have a dedicated health reporter.

Right. I think it’s very difficult for these papers. The fact of the matter is, many of these papers are just not going to do it. Covering health issues is complicated and time consuming. We all may think that they should do it, but they’re not. They don’t have the resources to do it. If they have a reporter, the reporter may cover different beats, which is true even in big-city papers. If they want to run this kind of content, this is a good way to do it.

So I think this column just sort of hit at the right time.

Why did you choose these states in particular?

Deron Lee is CJR's correspondent for Iowa, Missouri, Kansas, and Nebraska. A writer and copy editor who has spent seven years with the National Journal Group, he has also contributed to The Hotline and the Lawrence Journal-World. He lives in the Kansas City area. Follow him on Twitter at @deron_lee.