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CJR's guide to what the major media companies own.

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Viacom
National Amusements has controlling interests in CBS and Viacom.
1515 Broadway
New York, NY 10036
Voice (212) 258-6000
www.viacom.com
One of the largest global media empires, Viacom has a financial interest in broadcast and cable television, radio, Internet, book publishing, and film production and distribution. Some of this vertically integrated conglomerate's highly recognizable properties include the CBS network, MTV, Infinity broadcasting, Simon & Schuster, Blockbuster and Paramount Pictures. With such a diverse portfolio of properties, Viacom is one of the most profitable media giants as CBS is a top draw for older viewers while MTV remains the most popular teen orientated media outlet.

1912
Adolph Zukor founds the Famous Players Film Corp
1916
Famous Players becomes Paramount Pictures becomes Famous Players-Lasky Corp.
1916
Westinghouse engineer Dr. Frank Conrad begins experimental radio broadcasts from his home in Pittsburgh
1920
Westinghouse's KDKA in Pittsburgh begins scheduled radio programming with the Harding-Cox Presidential election returns
1924
Richard L. (Dick) Simon and M. Lincoln (Max) Schuster form Simon & Schuster. First publication is a cross word puzzle book.
1928
William S. Paley purchases the Columbia Broadcasting System for $400,000. Paley first became interested in the radio business after purchasing advertising time for his La Palina Cigar company.
1935
Famous Players-Lasky Corp. becomes Paramount Pictures after bankruptcy and reorganization.
1937
Edward R. Murrow and William L. Shirer do a radio news program which eventually becomes The CBS World News Roundup
1938
CBS buys American Record Company, owner of the Columbia Phonograph label. CBS renames the division Columbia Record Corp.
1941
CBS launches the first commercial black & white television broadcast
1949
Department of Justice announces the Paramount decree which forces the film studios to sell off their movie theaters
1954
Sumner Redstone takes control of National Amusements Inc. (NAI), a chain of movie theaters
1961
Murrow resigns from CBS
1964
CBS purchases the New York Yankees
1966
Diversified conglomerate, Gulf + Western, buys Paramount Pictures. Gulf + Western is owned by Charles Bluhdorn
1968
CBS teams up with a Japanese company to form CBS-Sony Records
1970
FCC's Fin-Syn ruling limits the financial interest television networks can have in syndicated programming. As a result, Viacom is formed after CBS spins off its television programming arm
1973
CBS sells Yankees to George Steinbrenner
1981
Dan Rather replaces Walter Cronkite as anchor on the CBS Evening News
1981
(August 1) MTV is launched
1985
Ted Turner makes a takeover attempt on CBS. Loew's president, Laurence Tisch, buys a 25% share in CBS to block Turner's takeover. Loews is a multi-national conglomerate with interests ranging from tobacco to insurance. Jesse Helms and Ivan Boesky also make unsuccessful bids for CBS.
1985
First Blockbuster Video store opens in Dallas
1986
Tisch becomes CEO of CBS
1987
Redstone becomes Chairman of the Board of Viacom after NAI buys a majority interest in it
1987
CBS sells its entire book publishing division for $500 million
1987
Wayne Huizenga, who made his money in the waste business, buys Blockbuster
1989
Gulf + Western changes its name to Paramount Communications
1990
Paley dies of a heart attack at age 89
1994
Viacom acquires Paramount Communications for $10 billion. Viacom was in a bidding war for Paramount with USA Networks.
1994
Viacom acquires Blockbuster Video from Huizenga for $8.4 billion
1995
Viacom sells Madison Square Garden and its related properties to Cablevision, and ITT for $1 billion
1995
Viacom sells its cable systems to John Malone's TCI
1995
(November) CBS is sold to the Westinghouse Corporation for $5.4 billion
1995
(January 16) UPN network hits the television airwaves
1996
Redstone becomes Viacom's CEO
1996
Westinghouse/CBS buys Infinity radio broadcasting and outdoor advertising group for $4.7 billion. This deal is mainly a result of the Telecommunications Act of 1996 which heavily deregulated the media industry and allowed a company to significantly increase the amount of radio stations it could own.
1997
CBS buys American Radio Systems chain
1997
Viacom deals its educational, professional and reference publishing businesses to Pearson for 4.6 billion. Viacom retains Simon & Schuster.
1997
Westinghouse changes name to CBS and sells its hardware and manufacturing operations
1999
CBS buys King World Productions, leading television program syndicator, for $2.5 billion
1999
Infinity buys Outdoor Systems billboard group for $8.3 billion.
1999
(September, 7) Viacom and CBS announce merger. The $50 billion deal, the largest media merger of the time, comes one month after the FCC gives approval to duopolies. The new Viacom has 33 television stations which eclipse the FCC's 35 % ownership cap. The cap is based on the amount of stations one company owns that reach 35% or more of the nation's television households.
2001
United States Court of Appeals, DC Circuit gives Viacom temporary approval to exceed the 35% ownership cap
2001
Viacom completes $3 billion deal for BET Inc.
2002
Viacom completes acquisition of KCAL-TV (Los Angeles) from Young Broadcasting Inc. for $650 million. The deal forms a Viacom duopoly in Los Angeles raising the number of markets where it owns two broadcast stations to eight.
2003
Infinity Broadcasting owns and operates 185 radio stations, second in size to only Clear Channel Communications. Viacom Outdoor is the largest outdoor advertising entity in North America. Viacom Television Stations Group owns and operates 39 TV stations.
2004
After years of internal battles with Viacom CEO Sumner Redstone, Mel Karmazin, resigns as the company's chief operating officer. Karmazin was formely the president and CEO of CBS
2005
The "new" Viacom gains control of trendy Neopets, a popular children's website. Through Paramount, they also acquire DreamWorks.
2006
Viacom acquires several new holdings: Xfire, Atom Entertainment, and Harmonix.
2007
Viacom engaged in disputes with YouTube over copyrighted video clips, and removed their leaked clips from the site. They opted instead for a content licensing deal with similar videosharing website Joost. Later in the year, Viacom entered into a split venture with Global Broadcast News, the result of which was Viacom-18: a provider of Viacom channels in India as well as Network 18's Bollywood movie business. In December, Viacom signed a 5-year contract with Microsoft, thus ensuring mutually heightened advertising between the two companies.
Cable Networks
Atom Entertainment
AddictingGames
Atom.com
AtomUploads.com
Logotv.com
newnownext.com
Shockwave
BET Networks
BET
BET Event Productions
BET Gospel
BET Hip Hop
BET International
BET Mobile
BET Pictures
Centric
CMT
CMT Loaded
CMT Mobile
CMT On Demand
CMT Pure Country
CMT Radio
Colors
Comedy Central
Jokes.com
GameTrailers
GT Marketplace
GoCityKids
Logo
AfterEllen.com
AfterElton.com
MTV Networks
MTV
MTV Books
MTV Hits
MTV Jams
MTV2
MTVN International
Flux
Game One
Lazona.com
MTV Boombox
MTV OVERDRIVE
MTV Revolution
QOOB
TMF (The Music Factory)
Tr3s: MTV, Musica y Mas
VIVA
mtvU
mtvU.com
RateMyProfessors.com
Neopets
Nick at Nite
Nick Jr.
Nickelodeon
The Click
Nick Arcade
Nick GAS
Nickelodeon Consumer Products
Nicktoons Network
TeenNick
Palladia
ParentsConnect
Quizilla
Spike TV
Spike Filmed Entertainment
TV Land
VH1
VH1 Classic
VHUno
Vspot
Viacom International Media Networks
Film
Paramount Pictures Corporation
MTV Films
Nickelodeon Movies
Paramount Animation
Paramount Home Entertainment
Paramount Pictures
Paramount Vantage
Viacom Digital
EPIX
TheGodfather.com
iCarly.com
TheLastAirbenderMovie.com
PetPetPark.com
SouthParkStudios.com
Other
Rainbow Group (Minority Interest)
last updated 2/14/2013

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